As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on February 7, 2006

Registration No. 333-

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington D.C. 20549

________________________
FORM SB-2
REGISTRATION STATEMENT
UNDER
THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933
_______________________

WPCS INTERNATIONAL INCORPORATED
(Name of small business issuer in its charter)
 
 Delaware
 4899
 98-0204758
 (State or other Jurisdiction of
 (Primary Standard Industrial
 (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
 Incorporation or Organization)
 Classification Code Number)
 

One East Uwchlan Avenue
Suite 301
Exton, PA 19341
(610) 903-0400
(Address and telephone number of principal executive offices and principal place of business)

Andrew Hidalgo, Chief Executive Officer
One East Uwchlan Avenue
Suite 301
Exton, PA 19341
(610) 903-0400
(Name, address and telephone number of agent for service)
__________________________
 
Copies of all communications, including communications sent to agent for service, should be sent to:
 
Marc J. Ross, Esq.
Thomas A. Rose, Esq.
Sichenzia Ross Friedman Ference LLP
1065 Avenue of the Americas, 21st Flr.
New York, New York 10018
(212) 930-9700
(212) 930-9725 (fax)
Merrill M. Kraines, Esq.
Manuel G. R. Rivera, Esq.
Fulbright & Jaworski L.L.P.
666 Fifth Avenue
New York, New York 10103
(212) 318-3000
(212) 318-3400 (fax)
_______________
 
Approximate date of proposed sale to the public:
 
As soon as practicable after this Registration Statement becomes effective.

If this Form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. o
 
If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(c) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. o
 
If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. o
 
If delivery of the prospectus is expected to be made pursuant to Rule 434, please check the following box. o
 


 


CALCULATION OF REGISTRATION FEE
 
 
             
 
 
Proposed Maximum
 
Proposed Maximum
 
 
Title of Each Class of
 
Amount
 
Aggregate
 
Aggregate
 
Amount of
Securities to be Registered
 
to be Registered
 
Price per Security (1)
 
Offering Price
 
Registration Fee (1)
Common stock, $0.0001 par value
 
2,300,000 shares (2)
 
$11.915
 
$27,404,500
 
$2,932.28

(1)
Estimated solely for the purpose of calculating the registration fee pursuant to Rule 457(c) under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, based upon $11.915, the average of the high and low sale prices of the registrant’s common stock as reported on the NASDAQ Capital Market on February 2, 2006.
(2)
Includes up to 300,000 shares attributable to shares of common stock that may be purchased by the underwriters under an option to purchase additional shares to cover over-allotments, if any.
_________________________________
 
The registrant hereby amends this registration statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the registrant shall file a further amendment which specifically states that this registration statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act of 1933 or until the registration statement shall become effective on such date as the Commission, acting pursuant to said Section 8(a), may determine.




 

The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and it is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted. 
 
 
 
Subject To Completion,  Dated     , 2006

Preliminary Prospectus

2,000,000 Shares

logo for WPCS
 
Common Stock
 

 
We are offering 2,000,000 shares of our common stock. We have granted the underwriter a 30-day option to purchase up to an additional 300,000 shares to cover over-allotments.

Our common stock is traded on the NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol “WPCS.” We will apply to have our common stock approved for quotation on the NASDAQ National Market under the symbol “WPCS” to be effective upon completion of this offering. No assurances can be given that our common stock will be approved for quotation on the NASDAQ National Market. On February 6, 2006, the last reported sale price of our common stock on the NASDAQ Capital Market was $12.05 per share.
 

 
Investing in these securities involves significant risks. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 5.
 


     
Per Share
 
 
Total
 
Public Offering Price...........................................................................................................................................
 
$
   
$
   
Underwriting discount.......................................................................................................................................
 
$
   
$
   
Proceeds to WPCS, before expenses...............................................................................................................
 
$
   
$
   
 
The underwriters expect to deliver the shares on or about         , 2006.
 
Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.
 

 

PUNK, ZIEGEL & COMPANY


The date of this prospectus is     , 2006.
 



TABLE OF CONTENTS

   
Page
 
Prospectus Summary......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 
1
 
Risk Factors.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 
5
 
Use of Proceeds...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 
11
 
Price Range of Common Stock......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 
12
 
Dividend Policy...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 
12
 
Capitalization...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 
13
 
Selected Consolidated Financial Information.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 
14
 
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations ..........................................................................................................................................................................................................
 
15
 
Business...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 
26
 
Management....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 
33
 
Executive Compensation................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 
36
 
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 
40
 
Principal Stockholders....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 
41
 
Description of Securities................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 
42
 
Shares Eligible for Future Sale......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 
44
 
Underwriting....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 
45
 
Disclosure of Commission Position on Indemnification for Securities Act Liabilities.........................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 
46
 
Legal Matters...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 
47
 
Experts...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 
47
 
Where You Can Find Additional Information.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 
47
 
Index to Financial Statements........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................   F-1  
 
You should rely only on the information contained in this prospectus. We have not, and the underwriter has not, authorized anyone to provide you with information that is different. This prospectus is not an offer to sell, nor is it seeking an offer to buy, these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale of these securities is not permitted. You should assume that the information contained in this prospectus is accurate as of the date on the front of this prospectus only. Our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may have changed since that date.
 
All information contained herein relating to shares and per share data has been adjusted to reflect a 1:12 stock split effected on January 10, 2005.
 
All references herein to our fiscal year and our fiscal year end represent the twelve months ended April 30 and April 30, respectively, and all references herein to our fiscal quarters ended refer to July 31, October 31 and January 31, as appropriate.
 
This prospectus includes market and industry data that we obtained from internal research, publicly available information and industry publications. Our internal research is based on management’s understanding of industry conditions and has not been verified by any independent sources. Industry publications generally stated that the information they contain has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Neither we nor the underwriter make any representation as to the accuracy of such information.
 

 
 
PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

This summary highlights information contained elsewhere in this prospectus. This summary does not contain all of the information that you should consider before investing in our common stock. You should read the entire prospectus carefully, including the section entitled “Risk Factors” and the consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes included elsewhere in this prospectus, before making an investment decision. Unless the context clearly indicates otherwise, references in this prospectus to “we,” “us,” “our” and “WPCS” refer to WPCS International Incorporated and its subsidiaries on a consolidated basis.

Our Company

WPCS International Incorporated designs and deploys wireless networks. We provide design-build engineering services for specialty communication systems and wireless infrastructure. Specialty communication systems are wireless networks designed to improve productivity for a specified application by communicating data, voice or video information in situations where land line networks are non-existent, more difficult to deploy or too expensive. Wireless infrastructure services include the engineering, installation, integration and maintenance of wireless carrier equipment.

Wireless technology has advanced substantially to the point where wireless networks have proven to be an effective alternative to land line networks, a key factor in its broad acceptance. We believe the use of dedicated wireless networks for specified applications has improved productivity for individuals and organizations alike. Demand for wireless data services is accelerating the adoption of new technologies that enable wireless networks to deliver enhanced features and capabilities. These new technologies have increased the complexity of wireless systems, and created demand for the services of companies such as ours with specialized skills to address that complexity.

With seven offices across the United States, we provide our services to our customers nationwide. Because we are technology and vendor independent, we can integrate multiple products and services across a variety of communication requirements, creating the most appropriate solution for our customers. Wireless communication is primarily achieved through radio frequency, or RF, signals. We have extensive experience in RF engineering, a necessary skill in designing wireless networks free from interference with other signals and amplified sufficiently to carry data, voice or video with speed, accuracy and reliability. We believe the strength of our experience in the design and deployment of specialty communication systems gives us a competitive advantage, and has supported our rapid growth, both organically and through acquisitions.

Our goal is to become a recognized leader in the design and deployment of wireless networks for specialty communication systems and wireless infrastructure. For the fiscal year ended April 30, 2005, we generated revenues of $40.1 million, an increase of 81.9% from the fiscal year ended April 30, 2004. For the six months ended October 31, 2005, we generated revenues of $26.4 million, an increase of 50.3% over the comparable period in 2004, and net income of $1.1 million, an approximate tenfold increase over the comparable period in 2004. Our backlog at October 31, 2005 was approximately $19 million.

Our Strategy

Our strategy focuses on both organic growth and the pursuit of acquisitions that add to our engineering capacity and geographic coverage. Specifically, we will endeavor to:
 
 
·
Increase customer awareness by marketing the full range of our services to our customers;
 
·
Maintain and expand our focus in existing vertical markets such as public safety and gaming, and develop expertise in new vertical markets;
 
·
Strengthen our relationships with technology providers whose products offer benefits to our customers; and
 
·
Seek strategic acquisitions of compatible businesses that can be assimilated into our organization and that will add accretive earnings to our business.
 
 
 
1

 
 
Our Customers

Our customers include corporations, government entities and educational institutions. In our specialty communication systems segment, we believe our design and deployment of innovative wireless networks specific to the needs of customers in certain vertical markets has brought us recognition in these markets. We have worked with public safety customers such as the California Department of Transportation, or CALTRANS, gaming customers such as Bally’s, and healthcare customers such as Wake Forest University Baptist Hospital. In our wireless infrastructure services segment, our customers are major wireless service providers such as Sprint Nextel.

Risks Affecting Us

Our business is subject to numerous risks, as discussed more fully in the section entitled “Risk Factors” immediately following this prospectus summary, including:

 
·
Our success is dependent on growth in the deployment of wireless networks, and to the extent that such growth slows down, our revenues may decrease and our ability to continue operating profitably may be harmed;

 
·
We have a limited history of profitability which may not continue;

 
·
If we fail to accurately estimate costs associated with our fixed-price contracts using percentage-of-completion, our actual results may vary from our assumptions, which may reduce our profitability or impair our financial performance;

 
·
Failure to properly manage projects may result in unanticipated costs or claims;

 
·
The industry in which we operate has relatively low barriers to entry and increased competition could result in margin erosion, which would make profitability even more difficult to sustain;

 
·
Our business depends upon our ability to keep pace with the latest technological changes, the failure to which could make us less competitive in our industry;

 
·
Our failure to attract and retain engineering personnel or maintain appropriate staffing levels could adversely affect our business;

 
·
If we are unable to identify and complete future acquisitions, we may be unable to continue our growth;

 
·
Future acquired companies could be difficult to assimilate, disrupt our business, diminish stockholder value and adversely affect our operating results;

 
·
We derive a significant portion of our revenues from a limited number of customers, the loss of which would significantly reduce our revenues; and

 
·
Amounts included in our backlog may not result in actual revenue or translate into profits.
 
Our Corporate Information

We have five operating subsidiaries: Clayborn Contracting Group, Inc., a California corporation; Heinz Corporation, a Missouri corporation; Invisinet, Inc., a Delaware corporation; Quality Communications & Alarm Company, Inc., a New Jersey corporation; and Walker Comm, Inc., a California corporation. References in this prospectus to Clayborn, Heinz, Invisinet, Quality and Walker Comm refer to these companies, respectively.
 
Our principal executive offices are located at One East Uwchlan Avenue, Suite 301, Exton, Pennsylvania 19341, and our telephone number is (610) 903-0400. We are a Delaware corporation. We maintain a website at www.wpcs.com and the information contained on that website is not deemed to be a part of this prospectus.
 
 
 
2

 
 
 
The Offering
 
Common stock offered by us (1) 
 
2,000,000 shares
 
   
Shares outstanding prior to the offering (2)
 
4,251,236 shares as of February 3, 2006
 
   
Shares to be outstanding after the offering (1) (2)
 
6,251,236 shares
 
   
Use of proceeds
 
We estimate that our net proceeds from this offering will be approximately $            million. We intend to use these net proceeds for general corporate purposes, which may include potential strategic acquisitions and/or investments or repayment of all or a portion our existing bank debt, and for working capital. We have not entered into any binding commitments or agreements with respect to any potential strategic acquisition or investment and no assurances can be given that we will be able to identify a potential acquisition on terms we deem favorable.
 
   
NASDAQ Capital Market symbol
 
WPCS. We will apply to have our common stock approved for quotation on the NASDAQ National Market under the symbol “WPCS” to be effective upon completion of this offering. No assurances can be given that our common stock will be approved for quotation on the NASDAQ National Market.
 
   
 


(1) 
Assuming no exercise by the underwriter of its over-allotment option to purchase an additional 300,000 shares of common stock from us.
 
 
(2) 
Excludes 793,704 shares issuable upon the exercise of outstanding stock options at prices ranging from $4.80 to $19.92 and 2,141,771 shares issuable upon the exercise of outstanding warrants at prices ranging from $8.40 to $10.80.
 

3

 
 
 
 
Summary Consolidated Financial Information

The statements of operations data for the two fiscal years ended April 30, 2004 and 2005 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. The statements of operations data for the six months ended October 31, 2004 and 2005 and the balance sheet data as of October 31, 2005 have been derived from our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus, and, in the opinion of management, have been prepared on a basis consistent with the audited consolidated financial statements and include all adjustments, which consist only of normal recurring adjustments, necessary to present fairly in all material respects the information included in those statements. Our results of operations for the six months ended October 31, 2005 may not be indicative of results that may be expected for the fiscal year ending April 30, 2006. The data presented below have been derived from consolidated financial statements that have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements, including the notes, included elsewhere in this prospectus, and with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in this prospectus.

           
Six Months
   
Year Ended
     
Ended
   
April 30,
     
October 31,
   
2004
     
2005
     
2004
     
2005
         
(Unaudited)
Revenue
$
22,076,246
   
$
40,148,233
   
$
17,574,419
   
$
26,421,882
                             
Costs and expenses:
                           
Cost of revenue
 
17,286,099
     
32,445,470
     
14,224,298
     
19,469,223
Selling, general and administrative expenses
 
4,441,776
     
7,028,850
     
2,911,112
     
4,615,608
Depreciation and amortization
 
382,510
     
682,397
     
246,693
     
421,060
Total costs and expenses
 
22,110,385
     
40,156,717
     
17,382,103
     
24,505,891
Operating (loss) income
 
(34,139
)
   
(8,484
)
   
192,316
     
1,915,991
Interest expense
 
14,048
     
24,702
     
12,763
     
94,800
(Loss) income before income tax provision
 
(48,187
)
   
(33,186
)
   
179,553
     
1,821,191
Income tax provision
 
76,000
     
52,096
     
71,895
     
721,108
Net (loss) income
$
(124,187
)
 
$
(85,282
)
 
$
107,658
   
$
1,100,083
Basic net (loss) income per common share
$
(0.08
)
 
$
(0.03
)
 
$
0.06
   
$
0.29
Diluted net (loss) income per common share
$
(0.08
)
 
$
(0.03
)
 
$
0.06
   
$
0.29
Shares used in net (loss) income per share calculation:
                           
Basic
 
1,521,697
     
2,679,529
     
1,737,498
     
3,837,689
Diluted
 
1,521,697
     
2,679,529
     
1,804,162
     
3,846,313
 
 
           
As of
           
October 31, 2005
                           
As
                   
Actual
     
Adjusted
         
(Unaudited)
Balance sheet data:
                           
Cash and cash equivalents
               
$
1,800,224
   
$
 
Working capital
                 
9,441,772
       
Total assets
                 
34,345,110
       
Total liabilities
                 
12,589,934
       
Total shareholders’ equity
                 
21,755,176
       
 

 
(1)
The as adjusted balance sheet data as of October 31, 2005 gives effect to the receipt of net proceeds of $   million from the sale of 2,000,000 shares of common stock offered by this prospectus, after deducting the underwriter’s discount and estimated offering expenses payable by us.
 
 
 
4



RISK FACTORS

This investment has a high degree of risk. Before you invest you should carefully consider the risks and uncertainties described below and the other information in this prospectus. If any of the following risks actually occur, our business, operating results and financial condition could be harmed and the value of our stock could go down. As a result, you could lose all or a part of your investment.

Our success is dependent on growth in the deployment of wireless networks, and to the extent that such growth slows down, our revenues may decrease and our ability to continue operating profitably may be harmed.

Customers are constantly re-evaluating their network deployment plans in response to trends in the capital markets, changing perceptions regarding industry growth, the adoption of new wireless technologies, increasing pricing competition and general economic conditions in the United States and internationally. If the rate of network deployment growth slows and customers reduce their capital investments in wireless technology or fail to expand their networks, our revenues and profits, if any, could be reduced.

We have a limited history of profitability which may not continue.

While we had net income of approximately $1.1 million for the six months ended October 31, 2005, we incurred net losses of approximately $85,000 and $124,000 for the fiscal years ended April 30, 2005 and 2004, respectively. There can be no assurance that we will sustain profitability or generate positive cash flow from operating activities in the future. If we cannot achieve operating profitability or positive cash flow from operating activities, we may not be able to meet our working capital requirements. If we are unable to meet our working capital requirements, we may need to reduce or cease all or part of our operations.

If we fail to accurately estimate costs associated with our fixed-price contracts using percentage-of-completion, our actual results may vary from our assumptions, which may reduce our profitability or impair our financial performance. 

A substantial portion of our revenue is derived from fixed price contracts. Under these contracts, we set the price of our services on an aggregate basis and assume the risk that the costs associated with our performance may be greater than we anticipated. We recognize revenue and profit on these contracts as the work on these projects progresses on a percentage-of-completion basis. Under the percentage-of-completion method, contracts in process are valued at cost plus accrued profits less earned revenues and progress payments on uncompleted contracts.

The percentage-of-completion method therefore relies on estimates of total expected contract costs. These costs may be affected by a variety of factors, such as lower than anticipated productivity, conditions at work sites differing materially from what was anticipated at the time we bid on the contract and higher costs of materials and labor. Contract revenue and total cost estimates are reviewed and revised periodically as the work progresses, such that adjustments to profit resulting from revisions are made cumulative to the date of the revision. Adjustments are reflected in contract revenue for the fiscal period affected by these revised estimates. If estimates of costs to complete long-term contracts indicate a loss, we immediately recognize the full amount of the estimated loss. Such adjustments and accrued losses could result in reduced profitability and liquidity.

Failure to properly manage projects may result in unanticipated costs or claims.

Our wireless network engagements may involve large scale, highly complex projects. The quality of our performance on such projects depends in large part upon our ability to manage the relationship with our customers, and to effectively manage the project and deploy appropriate resources, including third-party contractors and our own personnel, in a timely manner. Any defects or errors or failure to meet customers’ expectations could result in claims for substantial damages against us. Our contracts generally limit our liability for damages that arise from negligent acts, errors, mistakes or omissions in rendering services to our customers. However, we cannot be sure that these contractual provisions will protect us from liability for damages in the event we are sued. In addition, in certain instances, we guarantee customers that we will complete a project by a scheduled date or that the network will achieve certain performance standards. If the project or network experiences a performance problem, we may not be able to recover the additional costs we would incur, which could exceed revenues realized from a project.

5

The industry in which we operate has relatively low barriers to entry and increased competition could result in margin erosion, which would make profitability even more difficult to sustain.

Other than the technical skills required in our business, the barriers to entry in our business are relatively low. We do not have any intellectual property rights to protect our business methods and business start-up costs do not pose a significant barrier to entry. The success of our business is dependent on our employees, customer relations and the successful performance of our services. If we face increased competition as a result of new entrants in our markets, we could experience reduced operating margins and loss of market share and brand recognition.

Our business depends upon our ability to keep pace with the latest technological changes, the failure to which could make us less competitive in our industry.

The market for our services is characterized by rapid change and technological improvements. Failure to respond in a timely and cost-effective way to these technological developments may result in serious harm to our business and operating results. We have derived, and we expect to continue to derive, a substantial portion of our revenues from deploying wireless networks that are based upon today’s leading technologies and that are capable of adapting to future technologies. As a result, our success will depend, in part, on our ability to develop and market service offerings that respond in a timely manner to the technological advances of our customers, evolving industry standards and changing preferences.

Our failure to attract and retain engineering personnel or maintain appropriate staffing levels could adversely affect our business.

Our success depends upon our attracting and retaining skilled engineering personnel. Competition for such skilled personnel in our industry is high and at times can be extremely intense, especially for engineers and project managers, and we cannot be certain that we will be able to hire sufficiently qualified personnel in adequate numbers to meet the demand for our services. We also believe that our success depends to a significant extent on the ability of our key personnel to operate effectively, both individually and as a group. Additionally, we cannot be certain that we will be able to hire the requisite number of experienced and skilled personnel when necessary in order to service a major contract, particularly if the market for related personnel is competitive. Conversely, if we maintain or increase our staffing levels in anticipation of one or more projects and the projects are delayed, reduced or terminated, we may underutilize the additional personnel, which could reduce our operating margins, reduce our earnings and possibly harm our results of operations. If we are unable to obtain major contracts or effectively complete such contracts due to staffing deficiencies, our revenues may decline and we may experience a drop in net income.

If we are unable to identify and complete future acquisitions, we may be unable to continue our growth.

        Since November 1, 2002, we have acquired five companies and we intend to further expand our operations through targeted strategic acquisitions. However, we may not be able to identify suitable acquisition opportunities. Even if we identify favorable acquisition targets, there is no guarantee that we can acquire them on reasonable terms or at all. If we are unable to complete attractive acquisitions, the growth that we have experienced over the last three fiscal years may decline.

Future acquired companies could be difficult to assimilate, disrupt our business, diminish stockholder value and adversely affect our operating results.

Completing acquisitions may require significant management time and financial resources because we may need to assimilate widely dispersed operations with distinct corporate cultures. Our failure to manage future acquisitions successfully could seriously harm our operating results. Also, acquisitions could cause our quarterly operating results to vary significantly. Furthermore, our stockholders would be diluted if we financed the acquisitions by issuing equity securities. In addition, acquisitions expose us to risks such as undisclosed liabilities, increased indebtedness associated with an acquisition and the potential for cash flow shortages that may occur if anticipated financial performance is not realized or is delayed from such acquired companies.

6

We derive a significant portion of our revenues from a limited number of customers, the loss of which would significantly reduce our revenues.

We have derived, and believe that we will continue to derive, a significant portion of our revenues from a limited number of customers. To the extent that any significant customer uses less of our services or terminates its relationship with us, our revenues could decline significantly. As a result, the loss of any significant customer could seriously harm our business. For the six months ended October 31, 2005, we had two separate customers which accounted for 16.6% and 12.7% of our revenues. For the fiscal year ended April 30, 2005, we had one customer which accounted for 15.5% of our revenues. Other than under existing contractual obligations, none of our customers is obligated to purchase additional services from us.  As a result, the volume of work that we perform for a specific customer is likely to vary from period to period, and a significant customer in one period may not use our services in a subsequent period.

Amounts included in our backlog may not result in actual revenue or translate into profits. 

As of October 31, 2005, we had a backlog of unfilled orders of approximately $19 million. This backlog amount is based on contract values and purchase orders and may not result in actual receipt of revenue in the originally anticipated period or at all. In addition, contracts included in our backlog may not be profitable. We have experienced variances in the realization of our backlog because of project delays or cancellations resulting from external market factors and economic factors beyond our control and we may experience delays or cancellations in the future. If our backlog fails to materialize, we could experience a reduction in revenue, profitability and liquidity.

Our business could be affected by adverse weather conditions, resulting in variable quarterly results. 

Adverse weather conditions, particularly during the winter season, could affect our ability to perform outdoor services in certain regions of the United States. As a result, we might experience reduced revenue in the third and fourth quarters of our fiscal year. Natural catastrophes such as the recent hurricanes in the United States could also have a negative impact on the economy overall and on our ability to perform outdoor services in affected regions or utilize equipment and crews stationed in those regions, which in turn could significantly impact the results of any one or more of our reporting periods.

Our management will have broad discretion in allocating the net proceeds from this offering, and the failure of our management to apply the net proceeds from this offering effectively could harm our business.

We currently intend to use the net proceeds from the sale of the common stock offered hereby for general corporate purposes, which may include potential strategic acquisitions and/or investments or repayment of all or a portion our existing bank debt, and for working capital. We have not determined the amount of net proceeds from the sale of our common stock in this offering that we will use for any of these purposes. Accordingly, our management will retain broad discretion as to the allocation of the net proceeds of this offering. The failure of management to apply these funds effectively could negatively impact our business.

If we are unable to retain the services of Messrs. Hidalgo, Schubiger, Heinz or Walker, our operations could be disrupted.

Our success depends to a significant extent upon the continued services of Mr. Andrew Hidalgo, our Chief Executive Officer and Messrs. Richard Schubiger, James Heinz and Donald Walker, our Executive Vice Presidents. Mr. Hidalgo has overseen our company since inception and provides leadership for our growth and operations strategy. Messrs. Schubiger, Heinz and Walker run the day-to-day operations of Quality, Heinz and Walker Comm, respectively. Loss of the services of Messrs. Hidalgo, Schubiger, Heinz or Walker could disrupt our operations and harm our growth, revenues, and prospective business. We do not maintain key-man insurance on the lives of Messrs. Hidalgo, Schubiger, Heinz or Walker.

7

Employee strikes and other labor-related disruptions may adversely affect our operations.

Our business is labor intensive, with certain projects requiring large numbers of engineers. Over 40% of our workforce is unionized. Strikes or labor disputes with our unionized employees may adversely affect our ability to conduct our business. If we are unable to reach agreement with any of our unionized work groups on future negotiations regarding the terms of their collective bargaining agreements, or if additional segments of our workforce become unionized, we may be subject to work interruptions or stoppages. Any of these events could be disruptive to our operations and could result in negative publicity, loss of contracts and a decrease in revenues.

We may incur goodwill impairment charges in our reporting entities which could harm our profitability. 

In accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards, or SFAS, No. 142, “Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets,” we periodically review the carrying values of our goodwill to determine whether such carrying values exceed the fair market value. All five of our acquired companies, Clayborn, Invisinet, Heinz, Quality and Walker Comm, each of which is a reporting unit, are subject to annual review for goodwill impairment. If impairment testing indicates that the fair value of a reporting unit exceeds it carrying value, the goodwill of the reporting unit is deemed impaired. Accordingly, an impairment charge would be recognized for that reporting unit in the period identified, which could reduce our profitability.

Our quarterly results fluctuate and may cause our stock price to decline.

Our quarterly operating results have fluctuated in the past and will likely fluctuate in the future. As a result, we believe that period to period comparisons of our results of operations are not a good indication of our future performance. A number of factors, many of which are beyond our control, are likely to cause these fluctuations.  Some of these factors include:

 
the timing and size of network deployments and technology upgrades by our customers;

 
fluctuations in demand for outsourced network services;

 
the ability of certain customers to sustain capital resources to pay their trade accounts receivable balances and required changes to our allowance for doubtful accounts based on periodic assessments of the collectibility of our accounts receivable balances;

 
reductions in the prices of services offered by our competitors;

 
our success in bidding on and winning new business; and

 
our sales, marketing and administrative cost structure.

Because our operating results may vary significantly from quarter to quarter, our operating results may not meet the expectations of securities analysts and investors, and our common stock could decline significantly which may expose us to risks of securities litigation, impair our ability to attract and retain qualified individuals using equity incentives and make it more difficult to complete acquisitions using equity as consideration.

Our stock price may be volatile, which may result in lawsuits against us and our officers and directors.

The stock market in general, and the stock prices of technology and telecommunications companies in particular, have experienced volatility that has often been unrelated to or disproportionate to the operating performance of those companies. The market price of our common stock has fluctuated in the past and is likely to fluctuate in the future. Between February 1, 2005 and February 1, 2006, our common stock has traded as low as $4.32 and as high as $12.78 per share, based upon information obtained from inter-dealer quotations on the OTC Bulletin Board for the period from February 1, 2005 until March 24, 2005 and information provided by NASDAQ Capital Market for the period from March 27, 2005 until February 1, 2006. Factors which could have a significant impact on the market price of our common stock include, but are not limited to, the following:

8

 
 
quarterly variations in operating results;

 
announcements of new services by us or our competitors;

 
the gain or loss of significant customers;

 
changes in analysts’ earnings estimates;

 
rumors or dissemination of false information;

 
pricing pressures;

 
short selling of our common stock;

 
impact of litigation;

 
general conditions in the market;

 
changing the exchange or quotation system on which we list our common stock for trading;

 
political and/or military events associated with current worldwide conflicts; and

 
events affecting other companies that investors deem comparable to us.
 
Companies that have experienced volatility in the market price of their stock have frequently been the object of securities class action litigation. Class action and derivative lawsuits could result in substantial costs to us and a diversion of our management’s attention and resources, which could materially harm our financial condition and results of operations.

Future changes in financial accounting standards may adversely affect our reported results of operations.

A change in accounting standards could have a significant effect on our reported results and may even affect our reporting of transactions completed before the change is effective.  For example, in December 2004, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued SFAS No. 123(R), “Share-Based Payment,” a revision of SFAS No. 123, “Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation,” which requires companies to expense all employee stock options and other share-based payments over the service period.  Implementation of this standard as required during the first fiscal quarter of our fiscal year 2007 may impair our ability to use equity compensation to attract and retain skilled personnel. It is likely that we will have to recognize additional compensation expense in the periods after adoption of this standard.

New pronouncements and varying interpretations of pronouncements have occurred and may occur in the future. Changes to existing rules or the questioning of current practices may adversely affect our reported financial results or the way we conduct our business.

Compliance with changing regulation of corporate governance and public disclosure may result in additional expenses.

Changing laws, regulations and standards relating to corporate governance and public disclosure, including the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, newly enacted SEC regulations and NASDAQ Stock Market rules, have created additional burdens for companies such as ours. We are committed to maintaining high standards of corporate governance and public disclosure. As a result, we intend to invest appropriate resources to comply with evolving standards.  This investment will result in increased general and administrative costs and a diversion of management time and attention from revenue-generating activities to compliance activities.

9

We can issue shares of preferred stock without stockholder approval, which could adversely affect the rights of common stockholders.

Our certificate of incorporation permits us to establish the rights, privileges, preferences and restrictions, including voting rights, of future series of our preferred stock and to issue such stock without approval from our stockholders. The rights of holders of our common stock may suffer as a result of the rights granted to holders of preferred stock that we may issue in the future. In addition, we could issue preferred stock to prevent a change in control of our company, depriving common stockholders of an opportunity to sell their stock at a price in excess of the prevailing market price.

There may be an adverse effect on the market price of our shares as a result of shares being available for sale in the future.

As of February 3, 2006, holders of our outstanding options and warrants have the right to acquire 2,935,475 shares of common stock issuable upon the exercise of stock options and warrants, at exercise prices ranging from $4.80 to $19.92 per share, with a weighted average exercise price of $8.37. The sale or availability for sale in the market of the shares underlying these options and warrants could depress our stock price. We have registered substantially all of the underlying shares described above for resale. Holders of registered underlying shares may resell the shares immediately upon issuance upon exercise of an option or warrant.

If our stockholders sell substantial amounts of our shares of common stock, including shares issued upon the exercise of outstanding options and warrants, the market price of our common stock may decline. These sales also might make it more difficult for us to sell equity or equity-related securities in the future at a time and price that we deem appropriate.
 
10


USE OF PROCEEDS

We estimate that we will receive net proceeds of approximately $          million from the sale of 2,000,000 shares in this offering (based upon the last reported sale price of our common stock on          , 2006), after deducting the underwriting discount and estimated offering expenses. If the underwriter’s over-allotment option is exercised in full, we estimate that we will receive an additional $              million in net proceeds. We intend to use the net proceeds for general corporate purposes, which may include potential strategic acquisitions and/or investments or repayment of all or a portion our existing bank debt, and for working capital. We have not entered into any binding commitments or agreements with respect to any potential strategic acquisition or investment and no assurances can be given that we will be able to identify a potential acquisition on terms we deem favorable. Pending these uses, the net proceeds will be invested in investment-grade, interest-bearing securities.

On June 3, 2005, we entered into a credit agreement with Bank Leumi USA under which we borrowed $3,000,000 under a $5,000,000 revolving line of credit. As of January 31, 2006, we had outstanding $3,000,000 in loans under the credit agreement, which mature on August 31, 2008. Loans under the credit agreement bear interest at a rate equal to either the bank’s reference rate plus one half (0.5%) percent, or LIBOR plus two and three-quarters (2.75%) percent, as we may request. As of January 31, 2006, the interest rate was 7.1875%. We used the initial funds provided by the loan to repay existing bank debt at Walker Comm of approximately $672,000, for the payment of approximately $758,000 to the former stockholders of our Quality subsidiary for monies due to them under the terms of the purchase of their company, and for working capital.
 
11


PRICE RANGE OF COMMON STOCK

Our common stock is currently traded on the NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol “WPCS.” Between January 10, 2005 and March 24, 2005, our stock traded on the OTC Bulletin Board under the symbol “WPCI.” Prior to January 10, 2005, our stock traded on the OTC Bulletin Board under the symbol “WPCS.”

For the period from May 1, 2003 to March 24, 2005, the table sets forth prices based upon information obtained from inter-dealer quotations on the OTC Bulletin Board without retail markup, markdown, or commission and may not necessarily represent actual transactions. For the period from March 27, 2005 to date, the following table sets forth the high and low closing sale prices of our common stock as reported by the NASDAQ Capital Market.

 
 Period
   
High 
   
Low 
 
               
Fiscal Year Ended April 30, 2004:               
First Quarter
 
$
22.56
 
$
4.68
 
Second Quarter
 
 
20.76
 
 
12.24
 
Third Quarter
 
 
20.40
 
 
10.92
 
Fourth Quarter
 
 
17.28
 
 
10.80
 
 
Fiscal Year Ended April 30, 2005:
   
   
 
First Quarter
 
$
14.88
 
$
7.80
 
Second Quarter
 
 
11.28
 
 
5.76
 
Third Quarter
 
 
8.28
 
 
4.32
 
Fourth Quarter
 
 
7.80
 
 
4.50
 
 
Fiscal Year Ending April 30, 2006:
   
   
 
First Quarter
 
$
9.18
 
$
4.32
 
Second Quarter
 
 
9.03
 
 
5.58
 
Third Quarter
 
 
12.78
 
 
6.12
 
Fourth Quarter, through February 6, 2006
 
 
12.50
 
 
11.33
 

On February 6, 2006, the closing sale price of our common stock, as reported by the NASDAQ Capital Market, was $12.05 per share. On February 3, 2006, there were 65 holders of record of our common stock.

DIVIDEND POLICY

We have never paid any cash dividends on our capital stock and do not anticipate paying any cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future. Under our credit agreement dated June 3, 2005, we are prohibited from declaring or paying dividends, except stock dividends, or making any other distribution. We intend to retain future earnings to fund ongoing operations and future capital requirements of our business. Any future determination to pay cash dividends will be at the discretion of the Board and will be dependent upon our financial condition, results of operations, capital requirements and such other factors as the Board deems relevant.


12


CAPITALIZATION

The following table sets forth our unaudited actual and as adjusted capitalization at October 31, 2005. The as adjusted column gives effect to the sale of 2,000,000 newly issued shares of common stock in this offering, based on an offering price of $          per share (based upon the last reported sale price of our common stock on        , 2006) and the receipt of net proceeds of approximately $          after deducting the underwriting discount and estimated offering expenses payable by us.
 
     
October 31, 2005
     
Actual
 
As Adjusted
     
(Unaudited)
Cash and cash equivalents
 
$
1,800,224
 $
 
Debt:
         
Loans payable (1)
 
$
497,550
 $
497,550
Borrowings under line of credit
   
3,000,000
 
3,000,000
Total debt
   
3,497,550
 
3,497,550
           
Shareholders’ equity:
         
Preferred stock, $0.0001 par value: 5,000,000 shares authorized; none issued
   
 
Common stock, $0.0001 par value: 75,000,000 shares authorized; 3,883,885 shares issued and outstanding (actual); and 5,883,885 shares issued and outstanding
(as adjusted)
 
 
 
388
 
 
Additional paid-in capital
   
21,407,234
   
Retained earnings
   
347,554
 
347,554
Total shareholders’ equity
 
 
21,755,176
   
           
Total capitalization
 
$
25,252,726
 $
 
 

(1)
Loans payable represent the current and long term portion of vehicle loans.

The number of shares of common stock immediately outstanding after this offering is based on 3,883,885 shares issued and outstanding as of October 31, 2005 on an actual basis and excludes:
 
 
800,154 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of stock options at a weighted average exercise price of $7.15 per share;
 
20,000 shares available for grant under our 2006 incentive stock plan; and
 
2,509,671 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of warrants at a weighted average exercise price of $8.77 per share.
 
13


SELECTED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL INFORMATION

The statements of operations data for the two fiscal years ended April 30, 2004 and 2005 and the balance sheet data as of April 30, 2004 and 2005 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. The condensed consolidated statements of operations data for the six months ended October 31, 2004 and 2005 and the balance sheet data as of October 31, 2005 have been derived from our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus, and, in the opinion of management, have been prepared on a basis consistent with the audited consolidated financial statements and include all adjustments, which consist only of normal recurring adjustments, necessary to present fairly in all material respects the information included in those statements. Our results of operations for the six months ended October 31, 2005, may not be indicative of results that may be expected for the fiscal year ending April 30, 2006. The data presented below have been derived from consolidated financial statements that have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements, including the notes, included elsewhere in the prospectus, and with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in this prospectus.
 
           
Six Months
   
Year Ended
     
Ended
   
April 30,
     
October 31,
   
2004
     
2005
     
2004
     
2005
         
(Unaudited)
Revenue
$
22,076,246
   
$
40,148,233
   
$
17,574,419
   
$
26,421,882
                             
Costs and expenses:
                           
Cost of revenue
 
17,286,099
     
32,445,470
     
14,224,298
     
19,469,223
Selling, general and administrative expenses
 
4,441,776
     
7,028,850
     
2,911,112
     
4,615,608
Depreciation and amortization
 
382,510
     
682,397
     
246,693
     
421,060
Total costs and expenses
 
22,110,385
     
40,156,717
     
17,382,103
     
24,505,891
Operating (loss) income
 
(34,139
)
   
(8,484
)
   
192,316
     
1,915,991
Interest expense
 
14,048
     
24,702
     
12,763
     
94,800
(Loss) income before income tax provision
 
(48,187
)
   
(33,186
)
   
179,553
     
1,821,191
Income tax provision
 
76,000
     
52,096
     
71,895
     
721,108
Net (loss) income
$
(124,187
)
 
$
(85,282
)
 
$
107,658
   
$
1,100,083
Basic net (loss) income per common share
$
(0.08
)
 
$
(0.03
)
 
$
0.06
   
$
0.29
Diluted net (loss) income per common share
$
(0.08
)
 
$
(0.03
)
 
$
0.06
   
$
0.29
Shares used in net (loss) income per share calculation:
                           
Basic
 
1,521,697
     
2,679,529
     
1,737,498
     
3,837,689
Diluted
 
1,521,697
     
2,679,529
     
1,804,162
     
3,846,313
 

 
 
            
As  of April 30,
          
As of
   
2004 
     
2005 
             
October 31, 2005
   
 
     
 
             
(Unaudited)
Balance sheet data:                            
                             
Cash and cash equivalents
$
1,984,636
   
$
989,252
   
 
     
$
1,800,224
Working capital
 
2,396,169
     
5,145,320
             
9,441,772
Total assets
 
20,882,097
     
30,176,711
             
34,345,110
Total liabilities
 
9,594,342
     
9,821,618
             
12,589,934
Total shareholders’ equity
 
11,287,755
     
20,355,093
             
21,755,176
 
 

14


MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS
OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Some of the information in this prospectus contains forward-looking statements that involve substantial risks and uncertainties. You can identify these statements by forward-looking words such as “may,” “will,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate” and “continue,” or similar words. You should read statements that contain these words carefully because they:
 
 
·
discuss our future expectations;
 
·
contain projections of our future results of operations or of our financial condition; and
 
·
state other “forward-looking” information.
 
We believe it is important to communicate our expectations. However, there may be events in the future that we are not able to accurately predict or over which we have no control. The risk factors contained within this prospectus, as well as any cautionary language in this prospectus, provide examples of risks, uncertainties and events that may cause our actual results to differ materially from the expectations we describe in our forward-looking statements. You should be aware that the occurrence of the events described in these risk factors could have an adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Business Overview

We respond to the growing demand in wireless communications by providing engineering services for the design and deployment of wireless networks. We operate in two segments that we define as specialty communication systems and wireless infrastructure services.

We generate our revenue by providing a range of services including the design, deployment and maintenance of:
 
 
·
two-way radio communication systems, which are used primarily for emergency dispatching;
 
·
Wi-Fi networks, which are wireless local area networks that operate on a set of product compatibility standards;
 
·
WiMAX networks, which are networks that can operate at higher speeds and over greater distances than Wi-Fi;
 
·
mesh networks, which are redundant systems to route information between points;
 
·
millimeter wave networks, which are high capacity networks for high speed wireless access;
 
·
fixed wireless networks, which are used in point-to-point outdoor communications;
 
·
Radio Frequency Identification, or RFID, networks, which allow customers to identify and track assets;
 
·
free-space optics, which is a wireless communication technology that uses light to transmit voice, data and video; and
 
·
commercial cellular systems, which are used primarily for mobile communications.
 
Specialty communication systems are wireless networks for a specified customer application. In this segment, we can utilize any facet of wireless technology or a combination of various wireless technologies to engineer a cost effective network for a customer’s wireless communication requirement. Customers include corporations, government entities and educational institutions. For the six months ended October 31, 2005, specialty communication systems represented approximately 86% of our total revenue.

Wireless infrastructure services include the design, deployment and maintenance of commercial cellular systems. The primary customers in this category include major wireless service providers such as Sprint Nextel and Cingular. For the six months ended October 31, 2005, wireless infrastructure services represented approximately 14% of our total revenue.
 
15

Management currently considers the following events, trends and uncertainties to be important in understanding our results of operations and financial condition:

 
·
For the six months ended October 31, 2005, the specialty communication systems segment represented approximately 86% of total revenue, and the wireless infrastructure services segment represented approximately 14% of total revenue, as compared to approximately 78% and 22%, respectively, in the fiscal year ended April 30, 2005. This shift in revenue composition towards the specialty communication systems segment was primarily a result of our acquisition of Quality in the third fiscal quarter of 2005.

 
·
As we continue to search for acquisitions, our primary goal is to identify companies who are performing well financially and are compatible with the services that we perform in the specialty communication systems segment. This trend could lead to a further shift in our revenue composition towards the specialty communication systems segment. We believe that the strength of our experience in the design and deployment of specialty communication systems gives us a competitive advantage.

 
·
We also seek to achieve organic growth in our existing business by maximizing the value of our existing customer base, maintaining and expanding our focus in vertical markets and developing our relationships with technology providers.

 
·
We believe that the emergence of new and improved technologies such as WiMAX will create additional opportunities for us to design and deploy solutions through the use of the latest technologies and assisting existing customers in enhancing the efficiency of their existing wireless networks using new technologies.

 
·
We believe that the wireless carriers will continue to make expenditures to build and upgrade their networks, increase existing capacity, upgrade their networks with new technologies and maintain their existing infrastructure. In response to this trend, we will continue to provide network deployment services that address wireless carrier needs.
 
Historical Overview

On May 17, 2002, under an agreement and plan of merger, Phoenix Star Ventures Inc., a publicly held corporation, acquired WPCS Holdings, Inc., a Delaware corporation, by issuing approximately 458,334 shares of its common stock to stockholders of WPCS Holdings in exchange of all the outstanding shares of WPCS Holdings. WPCS Holdings was incorporated in the State of Delaware on November 15, 2001. The stockholders of WPCS Holdings, after the acquisition, owned the majority of the combined company. The acquisition was accounted for as a reverse acquisition in which WPCS Holdings was the acquiror. Concurrent with the acquisition, Phoenix Star Ventures, the parent company, changed its name to WPCS International Incorporated.

On November 12, 2002, we acquired all of the outstanding shares of Invisinet in exchange for an aggregate of 83,334 newly issued shares of our common stock with a fair value of approximately $1,750,000.

On December 30, 2002, we acquired all of the outstanding shares of Walker Comm in exchange for an aggregate of 207,167 newly issued shares of our common stock with a fair value of approximately $4,574,000 and $500,000 cash consideration.

On August 22, 2003, we acquired all of the outstanding shares of Clayborn in exchange for an aggregate of 68,871 newly issued shares of our common stock with a fair value of approximately $868,000 and $900,000 cash consideration. An additional $1,100,000 is due by September 30, 2007, payable in quarterly distributions, by payment to the Clayborn stockholders of 50% of the quarterly post-tax profits, as defined, of Clayborn and a final payment of any remaining balance on that date.

On April 2, 2004, we acquired all of the outstanding common stock of Heinz for $1,000,000, as follows: (1) $700,000 of our common stock, based on the closing price of its common stock on March 30, 2004 of $11.76 per share, for an aggregate of 59,524 newly issued shares of our common stock and (2) $300,000 total cash consideration, of which $100,000 was paid at closing and a $200,000 non-interest bearing promissory note was issued. Of the $200,000, $75,000 was paid in April 2005, $75,000 is payable on the second anniversary of the closing date and $50,000 is payable on the third anniversary of the closing date.

16

On November 16, 2004, we sold an aggregate of 2,083,887 shares of our common stock and common stock purchase warrants to purchase 2,083,887 shares of our common stock at $8.40 per share to eight investors for $10,000,000.

On November 24, 2004, we acquired all of the outstanding common stock of Quality for aggregate consideration of approximately $7,458,000 in cash, net of acquisition transaction costs. $6,700,000 was paid at closing, and additional purchase price adjustments of approximately $758,000 were subsequently paid to settle working capital adjustments and income tax reimbursements.

Effective January 10, 2005, a majority of our stockholders approved a one-for-twelve reverse stock split of our common stock, decreasing the number of issued and outstanding shares of common stock from 45,849,976 shares to 3,821,385 shares. The par value of the common stock was not affected by the reverse stock split and remains at $0.0001 per share.

On March 28, 2005, our common stock began trading on the NASDAQ Capital Market. Our common stock is traded under the symbol “WPCS.”

Corporate Structure

We operate through our subsidiaries, Clayborn, Heinz, Invisinet, Quality and Walker Comm. WPCS’ operations consist of expenses for corporate salaries and external professional fees, such as accounting, legal and investor relations costs, which are not allocated to the subsidiaries. Our corporate structure is as set forth in the following diagram:
 
 

 Chart for WPCS

 
 
17

 
Results of Operations

Comparison of Fiscal Years Ended April 30, 2005 and 2004

Consolidated results for the fiscal years ended April 30, 2005 and 2004 were as follows. Certain reclassifications have been made to prior fiscal year consolidated financial statements to conform to the current presentation.
 
 
   
 Year Ended
April 30,
 
         2005            2004      
Revenue
 
$
40,148,233
   
100.0
%
$
22,076,246
   
100.0
%
 
                 
Costs and expenses:
                 
Cost of revenue
   
32,445,470
   
80.8
%
 
17,286,099
   
78.3
%
Selling, general and administrative expenses
   
7,028,850
   
17.5
%
 
4,441,776
   
20.1
%
Depreciation and amortization
   
682,397
   
1.7
%
 
382,510
   
1.7
%
 
                 
Total costs and expenses
   
40,156,717
   
100.0
%
 
22,110,385
   
100.1
%
 
                 
Operating loss
   
(8,484
)
 
0.0
%
 
(34,139
)
 
-0.1
%
 
                 
Interest expense
   
24,702
   
0.1
%
 
14,048
   
0.1
%
 
                 
Loss before income tax provision
   
(33,186
)
 
-0.1
%
 
(48,187
)
 
-0.2
%
 
                 
Income tax provision
   
52,096
   
0.1
%
 
76,000
   
0.4
%
 
                 
Net loss
 
$
(85,282
)
 
-0.2
%
$
(124,187
)
 
-0.6
%
 
Revenue

Revenue for the fiscal year ended April 30, 2005 was approximately $40,148,000, as compared to $22,076,000 for the prior fiscal year, an increase of 81.9%. The increase in revenue was attributable to organic growth expansion of our customer base and new contract awards of approximately $7,600,000 and approximately $10,400,000 from the acquisitions of Heinz and Quality. For the fiscal year ended April 30, 2005, we had one customer which comprised 15.5% of our revenues.

Total revenue from the specialty communication systems segment for the fiscal years ended April 30, 2005 and 2004 was approximately $31,497,000 or 78.5% of total revenue and $17,508,000 or 79.3% of total revenue, respectively. Wireless infrastructure services segment revenue for the fiscal years ended April 30, 2005 and 2004 was approximately $8,651,000 or 21.5% of total revenue and $4,568,000 or 20.7% of total revenue, respectively.
 
Cost of Revenue

Cost of revenue consists of direct costs on contracts, including materials, direct labor, third party subcontractor services, union benefits and other overhead costs. Our cost of revenue was approximately $32,445,000 or 80.8% of revenue for the fiscal year ended April 30, 2005, compared to $17,286,000 or 78.3% of revenue for the prior fiscal year. The dollar increase in our total cost of revenue was due to the corresponding increase in revenue during the fiscal year ended April 30, 2005 as a result of organic growth in revenue and the acquisitions of Heinz and Quality. In addition, the increase in total cost of revenue was due to an increase in costs incurred on certain contracts that were recognized during the fiscal year ended April 30, 2005 of approximately $1,200,000. The increase in cost of revenue as a percentage of revenue was due primarily to an increase in costs incurred on certain contracts, offset by the revenue mix attributable to the acquisitions of Heinz and Quality.

18

The specialty communication systems segment cost of revenue and cost of revenue as a percentage of revenue for the fiscal years ended April 30, 2005 and 2004 were approximately $25,919,000 and 82.3% and $13,831,000 and 79.0%, respectively. As discussed above, the dollar increase in our total cost of revenue was due to the corresponding increase in revenue during the fiscal year ended April 30, 2005 as a result of organic growth in revenue from Walker Comm and Clayborn, and the acquisitions of Clayborn and Quality. In addition, the increase in total cost of revenue was due to an increase in costs incurred on certain Walker Comm contracts that were recognized during the fiscal year of approximately $1,200,000. The increase in cost of revenue as a percentage of revenue was due to an increase in the costs incurred on certain Walker Comm contracts recognized during the period, partially offset by lower cost of revenue on revenues attributable to the Quality acquisition.

Wireless infrastructure services segment cost of revenue and cost of revenue as a percentage of revenue for the fiscal years ended April 30, 2005 and 2004 were approximately $6,526,000 and 75.4% and $3,455,000 and 75.6%, respectively. The dollar increase in our total cost of revenue was due to the corresponding increase in revenue during the fiscal year ended April 30, 2005 as a result of the acquisition of Heinz. The decrease in cost of revenue as a percentage of revenue was due to the revenue mix attributable to the acquisition of Heinz.

Selling, General and Administrative Expenses

For the fiscal year ended April 30, 2005, total selling, general and administrative expenses were $7,029,000 or 17.5% of total revenue compared to $4,442,000 or 20.1% of total revenue for the prior fiscal year. The percentage decrease is due to the increase in total revenue in fiscal 2005. Included in selling, general and administrative expenses for the fiscal year ended April 30, 2005 were $3,656,000 for salaries, commissions, and payroll taxes. The increase in salaries and payroll taxes compared to the prior fiscal year is due to the increase in headcount as a result of the acquisitions of Clayborn, Heinz and Quality. Professional fees were $537,000, which included accounting, legal and investor relation fees. Insurance costs were $1,164,000 and rent for office facilities was $358,000. Automobile and other travel expenses were $422,000 and telecommunication expenses were $196,000. Other selling, general and administrative expenses totaled $696,000. For the fiscal year ended April 30, 2005, total selling, general and administrative expenses for the specialty communication systems and wireless infrastructure services segments were $4,658,000 and $1,180,000, respectively.

For the fiscal year ended April 30, 2004, selling, general and administrative expenses were $4,442,000 or 20.1% of revenue. Included in the selling, general and administrative expenses were salaries, commissions and payroll taxes of $2,100,000, professional fees of $566,000 and insurance costs of $730,000. Rent for our office facilities amounted to $250,000. Automobile and other travel expenses were $259,000 and telecommunication expenses were $133,000. Other selling, general and administrative expenses totaled $404,000. For the fiscal year ended April 30, 2004, total selling, general and administrative expenses for the specialty communication systems and wireless infrastructure services segments were $2,805,000 and $712,000, respectively.

Depreciation and Amortization

For the fiscal years ended April 30, 2005 and 2004, depreciation was approximately $372,000 and $228,000, respectively. The increase in depreciation is due to the acquisition of fixed assets from acquiring Clayborn, Heinz, and Quality. The amortization of customer lists and backlog for the fiscal year ended April 30, 2005 was $310,000 as compared to $154,000 for the same period of the prior fiscal year. The increase in amortization was due to the acquisition of customer lists from Clayborn, Heinz and Quality, and backlog from Heinz. All customer lists are amortized over a period of five to six years from the date of their acquisition. Backlog is amortized over a period of one year from the date of acquisition.

Net Loss

Net loss was approximately $85,000 for the fiscal year ended April 30, 2005. Net loss included federal and state income tax provisions of approximately $52,000. The variation in effective tax rates between periods is primarily due to the Clayborn and Heinz acquisitions and certain book-to-tax permanent differences.

We incurred a net loss of approximately $124,000 for the fiscal year ended April 30, 2004.

19

Comparison of Six Months Ended October 31, 2005 and 2004

Consolidated results for the six months ended October 31, 2005 and 2004 are as follows.
 
   
Six Months Ended
October 31,
 
         2005            2004      
Revenue
 
$
26,421,882
   
100.0
%
$
17,574,419
   
100.0
%
 
                 
Costs and  expenses:
                 
Cost of revenue
   
19,469,223
   
73.7
%
 
14,224,298
   
80.9
%
Selling, general and administrative expenses
   
4,615,608
   
17.4
%
 
2,911,112
   
16.6
%
Depreciation and amortization
   
421,060
   
1.6
%
 
246,693
   
1.4
%
 
                 
Total costs and expenses
   
24,505,891
   
92.7
%
 
17,382,103
   
98.9
%
 
                 
Operating income
   
1,915,991
   
7.3
%
 
192,316
   
1.1
%
 
                 
Interest expense
   
94,800
   
0.4
%
 
12,763
   
0.1
%
 
                 
Income before income tax provision
   
1,821,191
   
6.9
%
 
179,553
   
1.0
%
 
                 
Income tax provision
   
721,108
   
2.7
%
 
71,895
   
0.4
%
 
                 
Net Income
 
$
1,100,083
   
4.2
%
$
107,658
   
0.6
%
 
 
Revenue

Revenue for the six months ended October 31, 2005 was approximately $26,422,000, as compared to $17,574,000 for the six months ended October 31, 2004, an increase of 50.3%. The increase in revenue for the six months was primarily attributable to the acquisition of Quality on November 24, 2004. For the six months ended October 31, 2005, we had two separate customers which comprised 16.6% and 12.7% of our revenues.

Total revenue from the specialty communication systems segment for the six months ended October 31, 2005 and 2004 was approximately $22,602,000 or 85.5% of total revenue and $12,367,000 or 70.4% of total revenue, respectively. Wireless infrastructure services segment revenue for the six months ended October 31, 2005 and 2004 was approximately $3,820,000 or 14.5% of total revenue and $5,208,000 or 29.6% of total revenue, respectively.
 
Cost of Revenue
 
Cost of revenue consists of direct costs on contracts, materials, direct labor, third-party subcontractor services, union benefits and other overhead costs. Our cost of revenue was approximately $19,469,000 or 73.7% of revenue for the six months ended October 31, 2005, compared to $14,224,000 or 80.9% for the same period of the prior fiscal year. The dollar increase in our total cost of revenue was due to the corresponding increase in revenue as a result of the acquisition of Quality. The decrease in cost of revenue as a percent of revenue was due to the revenue mix attributable to contract revenue from Walker Comm, Clayborn and Heinz and to the recent acquisition of Quality.
 
20

The specialty communication systems segment cost of revenue and cost of revenue as a percentage of revenue for the six months ended October 31, 2005 and 2004 were approximately $16,580,000 and 73.3% and $10,401,000 and 84.1%, respectively. The decrease in cost of revenue as a percentage of revenue was due to the revenue mix attributable to contract revenue from Walker Comm and Clayborn and the acquisition of Quality.

Wireless infrastructure services segment cost of revenue and cost of revenue as a percentage of revenue for the six months ended October 31, 2005 and 2004 were approximately $2,889,000 and 75.6% and $3,824,000 and 73.4%, respectively. The increase in cost of revenue as a percentage of revenue was due to the revenue mix attributable to contract revenue from Heinz and Invisinet.

Selling, General and Administrative Expenses

For the six months ended October 31, 2005, total selling, general and administrative expenses were $4,616,000 or 17.4% of total revenue compared to $2,911,000 or 16.6% of total revenue for the same period in the prior fiscal year. Included in selling, general and administrative expenses for the six months ended October 31, 2005 were $2,520,000 for salaries, commissions, and payroll taxes. The increase in salaries and payroll taxes compared to the same period in the prior fiscal year is due to the increase in headcount as a result of the acquisition of Quality. Professional fees were $326,000, which included accounting, legal and investor relation fees. Insurance costs were $688,000 and rent for office facilities was $198,000. Automobile and other travel expenses were $368,000. Other selling, general and administrative expenses totaled $516,000. For the six months ended October 31, 2005, total selling, general and administrative expenses for the specialty communication systems and wireless infrastructure services segments were $3,354,000 and $500,000, respectively.

For the six months ended October 31, 2004, selling, general and administrative expenses were $2,911,000 or 16.6% of revenue. Included in the selling, general and administrative expenses were salaries, commissions and payroll taxes of $1,403,000, professional fees of $330,000 and insurance costs of $491,000. Rent for our office facilities amounted to $157,000. Automobile and other travel expenses were $162,000. Other selling, general and administrative expenses totaled $368,000. For the six months ended October 31, 2004, total selling, general and administrative expenses for the specialty communication systems and wireless infrastructure services segments were $1,719,000 and $525,000, respectively.

Depreciation and Amortization

For the six months ended October 31, 2005 and 2004, depreciation was approximately $272,000 and $168,000, respectively. The increase in depreciation was due to the purchase of property and equipment and the acquisition of fixed assets from acquiring Quality. The amortization of customer lists for the six months ended October 31, 2005 was $149,000 as compared to $79,000 for the same period of the prior fiscal year. The increase in amortization was due to the acquisition of Quality customer lists. All customer lists are amortized over a period of five to six years from the date of their acquisition.

Net Income
 
Net income was approximately $1,100,000 for the six months ended October 31, 2005, net of federal and state income tax expense of approximately $721,000.

Net income was approximately $108,000 for the six months ended October 31, 2004, net of federal and state income taxes of approximately $72,000.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

At October 31, 2005, we had working capital of approximately $9,442,000, which consisted of current assets of approximately $17,486,000 and current liabilities of $8,044,000.
 
Operating activities used $922,000 in cash during the six months ended October 31, 2005, comprised mainly of $1,100,000 of net income plus $409,000 in net non-cash charges, an increase in accounts receivable of $2,435,000, an increase in income taxes payable of $750,000, an increase in costs and estimated earnings in excess of billings on uncompleted contracts of $1,058,000, a decrease in inventory of $270,000, an increase in prepaid expenses and other current assets of $153,000, a decrease in accounts payable and accrued expenses of $223,000, an increase in billings in excess of costs and estimated earnings on uncompleted contracts payable of $399,000 and a net decrease in other assets of $19,000.

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Our investing activities utilized $900,000 in cash during the six months ended October 31, 2005, which consisted of $138,000 paid for property and equipment, $758,000 for the acquisition of Quality and $4,000 paid for acquisition transaction costs.

Our financing activities provided cash of $2,633,000 during the six months ended October 31, 2005. Financing activities included borrowings under lines of credit of $2,618,000, proceeds from the exercise of warrants of $300,000, debt issuance costs of $159,000, payment of amounts due to stockholders of $50,000 and repayments of equipment loans and capital lease obligations of approximately $76,000.

Our capital requirements depend on numerous factors, including the market for our services, the resources we devote to developing, marketing, selling and supporting our business, the timing and extent of establishing additional markets and other factors. On June 3, 2005, we entered into a credit agreement with a commercial bank. The credit agreement provides for a revolving line of credit in an amount not to exceed $5,000,000, together with a letter of credit facility not to exceed $500,000. We also entered into security agreements, under which each subsidiary granted a security interest to the bank in all of their assets.

Under the terms of the credit agreement, we are permitted to borrow up to $3,000,000 under the revolving credit line, based upon eligible receivables. Once we have provided consolidated financial statements which evidence that we have earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization of (i) $750,000 for the quarter ended July 31, 2005, (ii) $750,000 for the quarter ended October 31, 2005, and (iii) $2,500,000 for the fiscal year ended April 30, 2006, the revolving commitment amount will be increased to $5,000,000. The credit agreement contains customary covenants, including but not limited to (i) restrictions on the permitted ratio of total unsubordinated liabilities to tangible net worth plus subordinated indebtedness, (ii) our total tangible net worth, (iii) working capital, (iv) minimum earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization, and (v) dividend restrictions. As of October 31, 2005, we were in compliance with the credit agreement covenants. The loan commitment shall expire on August 31, 2008. We may prepay the loan at any time.

The loan under the credit agreement bears interest at a rate equal to either the bank’s reference rate plus one half (0.5%) percent, or LIBOR plus two and three-quarters (2.75%) percent, as we may request (6.625% as of October 31, 2005). We paid a facility fee to the bank of $50,000 on the closing date. In addition to the loan, a $500,000 letter of credit was re-issued in favor of Walker Comm’s surety bonding company as collateral for performance and payment bond requirements.

We used the initial funds provided by the loan, in the gross amount of $3,000,000, to repay existing bank debt at Walker Comm of approximately $672,000, for the payment of approximately $758,000 to the former stockholders of our Quality subsidiary for monies due to them under the terms of the purchase of their company, and for working capital.

On November 24, 2004, we acquired Quality for the aggregate consideration of approximately $7,458,000 in cash, net of acquisition transaction costs. A formal purchase price allocation was completed and the amounts assignable to tangible assets, other intangible assets and goodwill determined. The acquisition of Quality provided us additional project engineering expertise for specialty communication systems opportunities, broadened our customer base especially in the public safety sector and gaming industry, and expanded our geographic presence in the Northeastern United States.

At October 31, 2005, we had cash and cash equivalents of approximately $1,800,000 and working capital of approximately $9,442,000. With the funds available from the recently obtained revolving credit line and internally available funds, we believe that we have sufficient capital to meet our needs for at least the next 12 months from the date of this prospectus. Our future operating results may be affected by a number of factors including our success in bidding on future contracts and our continued ability to manage controllable costs effectively. To the extent we grow by future acquisitions that involve consideration other than stock, our cash requirements may increase.

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Backlog

As of October 31, 2005, we had a backlog of unfilled orders of approximately $19 million compared to approximately $18 million at October 31, 2004. We anticipate our backlog at October 31, 2005 to be recognized as revenue within eight months from that date. We define backlog as the value of work-in-hand to be provided for customers as of a specific date where the following conditions are met (with the exception of engineering change orders): (i) the price of the work to be done is fixed; (ii) the scope of the work to be done is fixed, both in definition and amount; and (iii) there is a written contract, purchase order, agreement or other documentary evidence which represents a firm commitment by the customer to pay us for the work to be performed. These backlog amounts are based on contract values and purchase orders and may not result in actual receipt of revenue in the originally anticipated period or at all. We have experienced variances in the realization of our backlog because of project delays or cancellations resulting from external market factors and economic factors beyond our control and we may experience such delays or cancellations in the future. Backlog does not include new firm commitments which may be awarded to us by our customers from time to time in future periods. These new project awards could be started and completed in this same future period. Accordingly, our backlog does not necessarily represent the total revenue that could be earned by us in future periods.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

We have no off-balance sheet arrangements.

Critical Accounting Policies

Financial Reporting Release No. 60, published by the SEC, recommends that all companies include a discussion of critical accounting policies used in the preparation of their financial statements. While all these significant accounting policies impact our financial condition and results of operations, we view certain of these policies as critical. Policies determined to be critical are those policies that have the most significant impact on our consolidated financial statements and require management to use a greater degree of judgment and estimates. Actual results may differ from those estimates.

We believe that given current facts and circumstances, it is unlikely that applying any other reasonable judgments or estimate methodologies would cause a material effect on our consolidated results of operations, financial position or liquidity for the periods presented in this report.

The accounting policies identified as critical are as follows:

Use of Estimates

In preparing financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, management is required to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and revenue and expenses during the reporting period. The most significant estimates relate to the estimation of percentage of completion on uncompleted contracts, valuation of inventory, allowance for doubtful accounts and estimated life of customer lists. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Accounts Receivable

Accounts receivable are due within contractual payment terms and are stated at amounts due from customers net of an allowance for doubtful accounts. Credit is extended based on evaluation of a customer’s financial condition. Accounts outstanding longer than the contractual payment terms are considered past due. We determine our allowance by considering a number of factors, including the length of time trade accounts receivable are past due, our previous loss history, the customer’s current ability to pay its obligation to us, and the condition of the general economy and the industry as a whole. We write off accounts receivable when they become uncollectible, and payment subsequently received on such receivables are credited to the allowance for doubtful accounts.

23

Goodwill and Other Long-lived Assets

We assess the impairment of long-lived assets whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that their carrying value may not be recoverable from the estimated future cash flows expected to result from their use and eventual disposition. Our long-lived assets subject to this evaluation include property and equipment and amortizable intangible assets. We assess the impairment of goodwill annually as of April 30 and whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that it is more likely than not that an impairment loss has been incurred. Intangible assets other than goodwill are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may not be fully recoverable. We are required to make judgments and assumptions in identifying those events or changes in circumstances that may trigger impairment. Some of the factors we consider include a significant decrease in the market value of an asset; significant changes in the extent or manner for which the asset is being used or in its physical condition; a significant change, delay or departure in our business strategy related to the asset; significant negative changes in the business climate, industry or economic condition, or current period operating losses; or negative cash flow combined with a history of similar losses or a forecast that indicates continuing losses associated with the use of an asset.

Our annual review for goodwill impairment for the fiscal years 2005 and 2004 found that no impairment existed. Our impairment review is based on comparing the fair value to the carrying value of the reporting units with goodwill. The fair value of a reporting unit is measured at the business unit level using a discounted cash flow approach that incorporates our estimates of future revenues and costs for those business units. Reporting units with goodwill include Invisinet and Heinz within our wireless infrastructure segment and Walker Comm, Clayborn and Quality within our specialty communication systems segment. Our estimates are consistent with the plans and estimates that we are using to manage the underlying businesses. If we fail to deliver products and services for these business units, or market conditions for these businesses fail to improve, our revenue and cost forecasts may not be achieved and we may incur charges for goodwill impairment, which could be significant and could have a material adverse effect on our net equity and results of operations.

Deferred Income Taxes

We determine deferred tax liabilities and assets at the end of each period based on the future tax consequences that can be attributed to net operating loss and credit carryovers and differences between the consolidated financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases, using the tax rate expected to be in effect when the taxes are actually paid or recovered. The recognition of deferred tax assets is reduced by a valuation allowance if it is more likely than not that the tax benefits will not be realized. The ultimate realization of deferred tax assets depends upon the generation of future taxable income during the periods in which those temporary differences become deductible.
 
We consider past performance, expected future taxable income and prudent and feasible tax planning strategies in assessing the amount of the valuation allowance. Our forecast of expected future taxable income is based over such future periods that we believe can be reasonably estimated. Changes in market conditions that differ materially from our current expectations and changes in future tax laws in the U.S. may cause us to change our judgments of future taxable income. These changes, if any, may require us to adjust our existing tax valuation allowance higher or lower than the amount we have recorded.
 
Revenue Recognition

We record revenue and profit on these contracts on a percentage-of-completion basis on the cost-to-cost method. Contracts in process are valued at cost plus accrued profits less earned revenues and progress payments on uncompleted contracts. Contracts are generally considered substantially complete when engineering is completed and/or site engineering is completed. We include in operations pass-through revenue and costs on cost-plus contracts, which are customer-reimbursable materials, equipment and subcontractor costs, when we determine that we are responsible for the engineering specification, procurement and management of such cost components on behalf of the customer.

24

We have numerous contracts that are in various stages of completion. Such contracts require estimates to determine the appropriate cost and revenue recognition. Cost estimates are reviewed monthly on a contract-by-contract basis, and are revised periodically throughout the life of the contract such that adjustments to profit resulting from revisions are made cumulative to the date of the revision. Significant management judgments and estimates, including the estimated cost to complete projects, which determines the project’s percent complete, must be made and used in connection with the revenue recognized in the accounting period. Current estimates may be revised as additional information becomes available. If estimates of costs to complete long-term contracts indicate a loss, provision is made in the current period for the total loss anticipated.

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

In December 2004, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued SFAS No. 123(R) (revised 2004), “Share-Based Payment,” which revises FASB Statement No. 123 and will be effective beginning with the first fiscal quarter for our fiscal year ending April 30, 2007. The new standard will require us to expense employee stock options and other share-based payments over the service period. The new standard may be adopted in one of three ways - the modified prospective transition method, a variation of the modified prospective transition method or the modified retrospective transition method. We are currently evaluating how we will adopt the standard and evaluating the effect that the adoption of SFAS 123(R) will have on our financial position or results of operations, although it is likely that we will have to recognize additional compensation expense in the periods after adoption.

No other recently issued accounting pronouncement issued or effective after the end of the most recent quarter is expected to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.
 
 
25

 
BUSINESS

Overview

We design and deploy wireless networks. We provide design-build engineering services for specialty communication systems, which are dedicated wireless networks for specified applications, and for wireless infrastructure, which encompasses commercial cellular systems for wireless carriers. Our range of services includes site design, spectrum analysis, engineering, trenching, electrical work, structured cabling, product integration, testing and project management. Because we are technology and vendor independent, we can integrate multiple products and services across a variety of communication requirements. This ability gives our customers the flexibility to create and implement the most appropriate solution for their communication needs, and the cost advantage that comes from dealing with competing vendors. Our customers include corporations, government entities and educational institutions. Within this customer base, we also serve vertical sectors such as public safety, gaming and healthcare, and wireless carriers.

The increasing demand for wireless services has become a driving force behind the recent growth in the global communications industry. Wireless technology has advanced substantially to the point where wireless networks have proven to be an effective alternative to land line networks, a key factor in its broad acceptance. The advantages of wireless over land line communication are apparent in the aspects of mobility, capacity, cost, and deployment. We believe the use of dedicated wireless networks for specified applications has improved productivity for individuals and organizations alike. We provide comprehensive and cost effective engineering services to address the demand for these wireless networks.

With seven offices across the United States, we provide our services to our customers nationwide. Our rapid revenue growth since we commenced operations in November 2001 is attributable to a combination of acquisitions and organic growth. For the fiscal year ended April 30, 2005, we generated revenues of $40.1 million, an increase of 81.9% from the fiscal year ended April 30, 2004. For the six months ended October 31, 2005, we generated revenues of $26.4 million, an increase of 50.3% over the comparable period in 2004, and net income of $1.1 million, an approximate tenfold increase over the comparable period in 2004. Our backlog at October 31, 2005 was approximately $19 million.

Industry Background

Worldwide use of wireless communications has grown rapidly as cellular and other emerging wireless technologies have become more widely available and affordable for businesses and consumers. The Cellular Telecommunications & Internet Association, or CTIA, in a summary prepared in October 2005, reported that there were approximately 194.5 million wireless subscribers in the United States, an increase of 15% over the prior year. The rapid growth in wireless communications is driven by the dramatic increase in wireless device usage, as well as strong demand for wireless data services and enterprise applications. According to the CTIA summary, wireless service revenue from data applications increased 85% from the prior year, to reach $3.7 billion for the first six months of 2005.

The growing number of wireless subscribers and the increase in usage by those subscribers have fueled the growth of the wireless services industry. According to a study prepared by the Ovum Group for CTIA in September 2005, U.S. wireless carriers spent $21.3 billion on capital investment in 2004. We believe enterprise wireless network investment will increase substantially as the industry continues to expand.

Advantages of Wireless Technology

Various improvements in wireless technologies have resulted in an environment where wireless solutions provide a number of key advantages over traditional land line solutions, including:

 
·
Mobility. Mobile communications and computing are among the driving forces behind the demand for wireless connectivity. The increased functionality and declining cost of mobile wireless devices has fueled further growth. Mobile connectivity has led to greater productivity as organizations transmit data and gather information from remote staff and locations where land line connectivity is unavailable. Such mobile connectivity has created significant cost savings in data collection, increased responsiveness, enabled greater access to enterprise resources, and improved controls.
 
26


 
·
Capacity. Current technology allows wireless transmission with capacity, quality and reliability superior to land line and comparable to fiber. For example, current radio technology is capable of two-way data transfer at rates up to 1 gigabits per second, allowing wireless networks to transmit content as quickly as over fiber.

 
·
Cost. Wireless networks cost less than comparable land line networks both to deploy and to operate. Wireless deployment is less expensive because the installation of a land line network is more labor-intensive, requires more time and may involve substantial right-of-way expenditures, while we expect the main cost component of wireless networks - equipment - to continue to decline as technology advances and production volumes increase. Operating costs of wireless networks are also lower because land lines require extensive troubleshooting to execute repairs. In addition, wireless networks bypass local service providers, eliminating recurring monthly charges.

 
·
Deployment. Because enterprise wireless networks do not require negotiating rights of way, substantial infrastructure engineering, time-consuming third party coordination efforts or additional FCC licensing, they can be deployed quickly and less expensively. Rapid deployment allows organizations to install networks more closely in line with immediate needs rather than having to commit to time-consuming engineering projects in anticipation of future growth.
 
Industry Trends

The demand for wireless data services can be tied to the following key trends:
 
 
·
increased security of wireless data transmission;

 
·
introduction of new technologies such as Wi-Fi, WiMAX and RFID;

 
·
increasing accessibility and affordability of Web-enabled devices; and

 
·
increased capacity of wireless networks, making them a legitimate substitute for land line communications.
 
The advantages gained through wireless communication solutions have expanded the scope of possible applications, creating demand for specialty communication systems.

Demand for wireless data services is accelerating the adoption of new technologies to enable wireless networks to deliver enhanced features and capabilities. Such technologies include Internet protocol, or IP, communications, including Voice over IP; fixed broadband wireless that permits the use of high capacity wireless connections between locations that are within a line of sight across relatively short distances; and mobile wireless technologies and new high capacity applications, commonly referred to as “3G” broadband wireless networks. According to the Telecommunications Industry Association’s 2005 Telecommunications Market Review and Forecast, Wi-Fi and WiMAX infrastructure revenues were expected to reach $5.2 billion and $115 million, respectively, in 2005. The proliferation of network technologies, enabled by the standardization around IP is increasing the challenge to integrate these technologies, protocols and services. All these new technologies have increased the complexity of wireless systems, and created demand for the services of companies with specialized skills to address that complexity.

Business Strategy

Our goal is to become a recognized leader in the design and deployment of wireless networks for specialty communication systems and wireless infrastructure. We have designed and deployed many systems incorporating innovative uses of wireless technology in various vertical markets. Our strategy focuses on both organic growth and the pursuit of acquisitions that add to our engineering capacity and geographic coverage. Specifically, we will endeavor to:
 
 
27


 
·
Market additional services to our customers. Each acquisition we make expands our customer base. We seek to expand these new customer relationships by making them aware of the diverse products and services we offer. We believe that providing these customers the full range of our services will lead to new projects or revenue opportunities and increased profitability.

 
·
Maintain and expand our focus in vertical markets. We have deployed successful, innovative wireless solutions for multiple customers in a number of vertical markets, such as public safety and the gaming industry. We will continue to seek additional customers in these targeted vertical markets who can benefit from our expertise, and look for new ways in which we can design wireless solutions to enhance productivity within these markets. We also look for new vertical markets where we can make a difference with compelling wireless solutions, and will continue to expand our vertical market coverage to include these new markets as appropriate.

 
·
Strengthen our relationships with technology providers. We will continue to strengthen the relationships we have with technology providers such as Avaya and Motorola. These companies rely on us to deploy their technology products within their customer base. We have worked with these providers in testing new equipment they develop, and our personnel maintain certifications on our technology providers’ products. We also look for innovative products which can be of benefit to our customers, and endeavor to establish similar relationships with new technology providers as part of our commitment to offering the most complete solutions to our customers.

 
·
Seek strategic acquisitions. We will continue to look for additional acquisitions of compatible businesses that can be assimilated into our organization and add accretive earnings to our business. Our preferred acquisition candidates will have experience with specialty communication systems, engineering capacity in a design-build format, an expansive customer base, and a favorable financial profile.
 
Services

We operate in two segments, specialty communication systems and wireless infrastructure services. Specialty communication systems are wireless networks designed to improve productivity for a specified application by communicating data, voice or video information in situations where land line networks are non-existent, more difficult to deploy or too expensive. Wireless infrastructure services include the engineering, installation, integration and maintenance of wireless carrier equipment. For the six months ended October 31, 2005, specialty communication systems represented approximately 86% of our total revenue, and wireless infrastructure services represented approximately 14% of our total revenue. For the fiscal year ended April 30, 2005, specialty communication systems represented approximately 78% of our total revenue, and wireless infrastructure services represented approximately 22% of our total revenue.

Specialty Communication Systems

The types of specialty communication systems that we implement are used for mobile computing and general wireless connectivity purposes. In mobile computing, the most popular use is the transfer of data, voice or video from a server to a mobile device, which can be achieved through the following applications:

 
·
asset tracking, which is a wireless network that monitors the location of mobile assets such as vehicles or stationary assets such as equipment;

 
·
telematics, which are instructions sent through a wireless network that controls a device such as a slot machine or traffic signal; and

 
·
telemetry, which is the acquisition of data from a measuring device such as the devices used at a water treatment plant to maintain the integrity of drinking water.
 
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In general wireless connectivity, we design and deploy wireless networks which allow entities to reduce their dependence on high cost leased land lines or provide them with a redundant back-up wireless network to their land line network.

Wireless communication is primarily achieved through radio frequency, or RF, signals. There are various RF communication methods used for connectivity, including Wi-Fi and WiMAX technology for local area and wide area networking, fixed wireless networks for point-to-point connectivity, and cellular communication for general voice and data transmission. We have the engineering expertise to utilize any facet of wireless technology or a combination of various wireless technologies to engineer a cost effective network for a customer’s wireless communication requirement. In addition, the design and deployment of a specialty communication system is a comprehensive effort that requires experience in RF engineering so that the wireless network is free from interference with other signals and amplified sufficiently to carry data, voice or video with speed and accuracy. Our extensive engineering expertise with RF communications makes us well suited to address these challenges for our customers.

We are technology and vendor independent. As wireless networks evolve, customers are increasingly showing a tendency to select independent service providers, allowing our independence to become an important differentiator. As open standards and IP-based architecture continue to supplant vendor proprietary protocols and products in the marketplace, we believe our independent position will allow us to capture an increasing share of the specialty communication systems market. We believe that the strength of our experience in the design and deployment of these specialty communication systems gives us a competitive advantage and has supported our rapid growth, both organically and through acquisitions.

Wireless Infrastructure Services

We provide wireless infrastructure services to major wireless carriers. Wireless carriers are focused on building and expanding their networks, increasing capacity, upgrading their networks with new technologies and maintaining their existing infrastructure. Our engineers install, test and commission base station equipment at the carrier cell site, including installations of new equipment, technology upgrades, equipment modifications and reconfigurations. These services may also include tower construction. The range of infrastructure services includes the following:
 
 
·
Installation, testing and commissioning of base station equipment, which is the installation of radio frequency equipment inside the shelter at a cell site, and testing to ensure that the equipment is operating prior to cell site activation;

 
·
Equipment modification and reconfiguration, which involves replacing old equipment with new equipment, re-routing cables, and re-locating equipment at the cell site;

 
·
Network modifications, which refers to work done on existing cell sites to increase capacity or change the direction of sectors or antennas;

 
·
Sectorization, which is the installation of antennas to existing cell towers to increase the capacity of the cell site; and

 
·
Maintenance, which includes antenna maintenance to replace damaged antennas, installing tower lighting control panels, sensors or repairing damaged shelters.
 
Project Characteristics

Our contracts are service-based projects providing installation and engineering services, which include providing labor, materials and equipment for a complete installation. The projects are generally staffed with a project manager who manages multiple projects and a field supervisor who is responsible for an individual project. Depending on contract scope, project staff size could range from two to four engineers to as high as 25 to 30 engineers. A project may also include subcontracted services along with our direct labor.
 

 
29

The project manager coordinates the daily activities of direct labor and subcontractors and works closely with our field supervisors. Project managers are responsible for job costing, change order tracking, billing, and customer relations. Executive management monitors the performance of all projects regularly through work-in-progress reporting or percentage-of-completion, and reviews this information with each project manager.

Our projects are executed on a contract basis. These contracts can be awarded through a competitive bidding process, an informal bidding process, or a simple quote request. Upon award of a contract, there can often be a delay of several months before work begins. The active work time on our projects can range in duration from a few days up to as long as two years. Once services under the contract commence, our average project length is approximately two months.

Customers

We serve a variety of customers in different market segments. In our specialty communication systems segment, we believe our design and deployment of innovative wireless networks specific to the needs of customers in certain vertical markets has brought us recognition in these markets.

In public safety, we have designed and deployed illuminated crosswalks activated by a wireless signal, wireless traffic monitoring systems and wireless changeable highway message signs for Amber Alert notification. In addition, we have designed and deployed inclusive emergency management systems that coordinate emergency services including 911 dispatching and records management. Our public safety customers have included CALTRANS, Amtrak, the New Jersey State Police and the State of New York.

In the gaming industry, we have developed expertise in the design and deployment of wireless networks to monitor slot machine activity for casino operators. The slot machines, which represent the highest percentage of revenue for any casino, are networked and constantly monitored from a central location. The network is designed to alert the casino operators if there is a malfunction, and provide the ability to repair any technical issues immediately and remotely, representing an economic benefit in both cost savings and elimination of lost revenue. In addition, we have established wireless two-way radio, paging and dispatch networks within casinos for improved communication. Our gaming customers have included Bally’s, Caesar’s Entertainment, Mohegan Sun Hotel & Casino and The Seminole Indian Nation.

In the healthcare industry, we have deployed systems such as the following:
 
 
·
a wireless network for the asset tracking of ambulances in order to improve medical dispatch services for patients;

 
·
the deployment of laptop computers in ambulances for the transmission of patient information to the hospital while in transit; and

 
·
a wireless network that allows medical staff to access consolidated patient medical records throughout the hospital via mobile wireless devices, improving the accuracy of patient care.
 
Our healthcare customers have included Amcare Ambulance, Wake Forest University Baptist Hospital, Somerset Hospital and Southeast Regional Medical Center.

We also provide design and deployment of wireless networks for general wireless connectivity. We have provided these services to customers within our vertical markets, as well as corporations such as United Parcel Service and real estate developers such as Silverstein Properties in the construction of the new 7 World Trade Center in New York City. Improved communication can be established between buildings by establishing Wi-Fi networks and fixed wireless networks that eliminate costly leased land lines. We also designed and deployed a wireless network for Alltel Stadium, the home of the Jacksonville Jaguars and site of the 2005 Super Bowl, which is used for point-of-sale inventory management for different vendors throughout the stadium.
 
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In our wireless infrastructure segment, our customers are major wireless service providers. We have provided services for Sprint Nextel, Cingular, T-Mobile, U.S. Cellular and Verizon. We are performing engineering services for a major wireless carrier related to a project mandated by the FCC. The project involves a multi-phase FCC mandated re-banding initiative to include mitigation of public safety radio interference at the 800MHz frequency by moving service to the 900 MHz frequency. The scope of our project requires the removal and replacement of certain equipment located at the cell site shelters to accommodate the frequency changes. In addition, we are upgrading and integrating non-wide band equipment within existing transmitter sites to allow for future frequency migration.

For the fiscal year ended April 30, 2005, we had revenue from one customer totaling $6.2 million, which comprised 15.5% of our total revenue. For the six months ended October 31, 2005, we had revenue from two customers totaling $4.4 million and $3.3 million, which comprised 16.6% and 12.7% of our total revenue, respectively.

Sales and Marketing

We have dedicated sales and marketing resources that develop opportunities within our existing customer base, and identify new customers through our vertical market focus and our relationships with technology providers. In addition, our project managers devote a portion of their time to sales and marketing. When an opportunity is identified, we assess the opportunity to determine our level of interest in participation. After qualifying an opportunity, our sales and marketing resources work with the internal project management teams to prepare a cost estimate and contract proposal for a particular project. We keep track of bids submitted and bids that are awarded. Once a bid is awarded to us, it is assigned to a project management team and included in our backlog. We focus almost all of our sales and marketing effort in the U.S. due to the robust market conditions.

Backlog

As of October 31, 2005, we had a backlog of unfilled orders of approximately $19 million compared to approximately $18 million at October 31, 2004. We anticipate our backlog at October 31, 2005 to be recognized as revenue within eight months from that date. We define backlog as the value of work-in-hand to be provided for customers as of a specific date where the following conditions are met (with the exception of engineering change orders): (i) the price of the work to be done is fixed; (ii) the scope of the work to be done is fixed, both in definition and amount; and (iii) there is a written contract, purchase order, agreement or other documentary evidence which represents a firm commitment by the customer to pay us for the work to be performed. These backlog amounts are based on contract values and purchase orders and may not result in actual receipt of revenue in the originally anticipated period or at all. We have experienced variances in the realization of our backlog because of project delays or cancellations resulting from external market factors and economic factors beyond our control and we may experience such delays or cancellations in the future. Backlog does not include new firm commitments which may be awarded to us by our customers from time to time in future periods. These new project awards could be started and completed in this same future period. Accordingly, our backlog does not necessarily represent the total revenue that could be earned by us in future periods.
 
Competition

We face competition from numerous service providers, ranging from small independent regional firms to larger firms servicing national markets. We also face competition from existing or prospective customers that employ in-house personnel to perform some of the same types of services that we provide. Historically, there have been relatively few significant barriers to entry into the markets in which we operate, and, as a result, any organization that has adequate financial resources and access to technical expertise may become a competitor. At the present time, we believe that there are no dominant competitors in the specialty communication systems segment. Some of the competition we face comes from companies that provide similar services, but are not vendor independent, such as Terabeam, Inc. and ARC Wireless Solutions, Inc., and from companies that offer general wireless connectivity services on a subscription model basis, such as Earthlink, Inc. and T-Mobile USA, Inc. The vendor-independent competitors in this market are relatively fragmented, and there is no recognized competitor who offers services similar to ours on a national scale. There are a number of engineering firms that could compete with us in the future, who have substantially greater resources. The competition we face in the wireless infrastructure services segment comes primarily from Wireless Facilities, Inc. and LCC International, Inc. There are also numerous regional competitors whom we encounter in our wireless infrastructure services business.
 
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The principal competitive advantage in these markets is the ability to deliver results on time and within budget. Other factors of importance include reputation, accountability, staffing capability, project management expertise, industry experience and competitive pricing. In addition, expertise in new and evolving technologies has become increasingly important. We believe that the ability to design, deploy and maintain all facets of wireless technology for various vertical sectors gives us a competitive advantage. We maintain a trained and certified staff of engineers that have developed proven methodologies for the design and deployment of wireless networks, and can provide these services on a national basis. In addition, we offer both a union and non-union workforce that allows us to bid on either labor requirement creating yet another competitive advantage.

However, our ability to compete effectively also depends on a number of additional factors which are beyond our control. These factors include competitive pricing for similar services, the ability and willingness of the competition to finance projects on favorable terms, the ability of customers to perform the services internally and the responsiveness of our competitors to customer needs.

Employees

As of February 1, 2006, we employed 219 full time employees, of whom 151 are project engineers, 23 are project managers, 39 are in general management and administration and six are executives. We have approximately 95 project engineers who are represented by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. A contract with these union employees expires November 30, 2008. We also have non-union employees. We believe relations with our employees are good.

Properties

Our principal executive offices are located in approximately 2,550 square feet of office space in Exton, Pennsylvania. We operate our business under office leases in the following locations:

Location 
   
Lease Expiration 
Date 
   
Minimum
Annual
Rent 
 
               
Auburn, California (1)
   
month-to-month
 
$
64,440
 
               
Exton, Pennsylvania
   
February 1, 2008
 
$
48,725
 
 
             
Fairfield, California (2)
   
February 28, 2011
 
$
94,125
 
               
Lakewood, New Jersey
   
August 31, 2007
 
$
90,370
 
               
Rocklin, California
   
January 31, 2008
 
$
27,000
 
               
San Leandro, California
   
July 31, 2006
 
$
13,756
 
               
St. Louis, Missouri
   
August 31, 2008
 
$
56,142
 


 
(1)   
The lease for our Auburn, California location is month to month; therefore the minimum annual rental price assumes we rent the property for the entire year.

(2)   
We lease our Fairfield, California location from a trust, of which Gary Walker, one of our Directors, is the trustee.

We believe that our existing facilities are suitable and adequate to meet our current business requirements.
 
Legal Proceedings

We are currently not a party to any material legal proceedings or claims.

32

 
MANAGEMENT

Directors and Executive Officers

Our directors and executive officers and their ages as of February 7, 2006 are as follows.

Name
 
Age
 
Position
Andrew Hidalgo
 
49
 
Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and Director
Joseph Heater
 
42
 
Chief Financial Officer
Donald Walker
 
42
 
Executive Vice President
James Heinz
 
46
 
Executive Vice President
Richard Schubiger
 
40
 
Executive Vice President
Norm Dumbroff
 
45
 
Director
Neil Hebenton
 
49
 
Director
Gary Walker
 
51
 
Director
William Whitehead
 
50
 
Director
 
Set forth below is a biographical description of each director and executive officer.

Andrew Hidalgo, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Hidalgo has been our Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer since our inception in May 2002 and served in the same capacity with the predecessor company WPCS Holdings, Inc. since September 2000. He is responsible for our operations and direction. Prior to that, Mr. Hidalgo held various positions in operations, sales and marketing with Applied Digital Solutions, the 3M Company, Schlumberger and General Electric. He attended Fairfield University in Fairfield, Connecticut.

Joseph Heater, Chief Financial Officer

Mr. Heater has been Chief Financial Officer since July 2003. From November 2001 to June 2003, Mr. Heater was the Controller for Locus Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a development stage pharmaceutical company. Prior to that, from April 1999 to September 2001, Mr. Heater was Director of Finance and Corporate Controller for esavio Corporation, an information technology consulting company providing application development, network design, integration, and managed services. Prior to that, from March 1995 to November 1998, Mr. Heater was Director of Financial Planning and Assistant Corporate Controller for Airgas, Inc. Mr. Heater holds a B.S. from the University of Nebraska and an M.B.A. from Villanova University.

Donald Walker, Executive Vice President

Mr. Walker has been Executive Vice President since December 2002. Mr. Walker was the founder of Walker Comm, Inc. and its Chief Executive Officer from November 1996 until its acquisition by WPCS in December 2002. He has over twenty-one years of project management experience and is a Registered Communications Distribution Designer (RCDD). In addition, Mr. Walker is a committee member with the National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA). Mr. Walker began his project engineer career at General Dynamics where he developed his engineering skills while managing large projects and coordinating technical staff.

James Heinz, Executive Vice President

Mr. Heinz has been Executive Vice President since April 2004. Mr. Heinz was the founder of Heinz Corporation and its President since January 1994 until its acquisition by WPCS in April 2004. Mr. Heinz has over twenty years of project engineering experience in civil and commercial engineering projects with over ten years specifically dedicated to wireless infrastructure services. Mr. Heinz is the Chairman of the Construction Advisory Board for Southern Illinois University and a general advisory member of the School of Engineering. He holds a B.S. degree in construction management from Southern Illinois University.
 
33

 
Richard Schubiger, Executive Vice President

Mr. Schubiger has been Executive Vice President since November 2004. Mr. Schubiger was a co-founder of Quality Communications and its President since December 1995 until its acquisition by WPCS in November 2004. Mr. Schubiger has over twenty years of experience in the wireless communications industry and has been involved with all facets including sales, service, design and project management. Prior to establishing Quality Communications, Mr. Schubiger worked for Motorola, Inc., designing and supporting major wireless systems for commercial and government users. Mr. Schubiger had a distinguished career in the United States Marine Corps where he served as a wireless engineering specialist involved with deployments throughout North America, Asia and Europe

Norm Dumbroff , Director

Mr. Dumbroff became a Director of WPCS in November 2002. Since April 1990, he has been the Chief Executive Officer of Wav Incorporated, a distributor of wireless products in North America. Prior to Wav Incorporated, Mr. Dumbroff was an engineer for Hughes Aircraft. He holds a B.S. degree in Computer Science from Albright College.

Neil Hebenton, Director

Mr. Hebenton became a director of WPCS in October 2002. Since February 2002, he has been Senior Director, Business Development, for Perceptive Informatics, Inc. (a subsidiary of PAREXEL International Corp.), a company offering clinical trial data management software applications to pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. From January 1998 to January 2002, he was the Managing Director for the U.K. based FW Pharma Systems, a multi-million dollar application software company serving the pharmaceutical and biotechnology sectors. Prior to that, Mr. Hebenton has held a variety of operational, scientific and marketing positions in Europe with Bull Information Systems (BULP-Paris, Frankfurt, Zurich) and Phillips Information Systems. He received his B.S. in Mathematics from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland.

Gary Walker, Director

Mr. Walker became a director of WPCS in December 2002. He is currently the president of the Walker Comm subsidiary for WPCS International, a position he has held since November 1996. Prior to his involvement at Walker Comm, Mr. Walker had a distinguished career with the U.S. Navy and also held an elected political position in Fairfield, California. He holds a B.A. in Business Management from St. Mary’s College in Moraga, California.

William Whitehead, Director

Mr. Whitehead became a director of WPCS in October 2002. Since October 1998, he has been the Chief Financial Officer for Neutronics Incorporated, a multi-million dollar process and safety systems manufacturer. Mr. Whitehead has held a variety of financial management positions with Deloitte & Touche and was Division Controller for Graphic Packaging Corporation from April 1990 to March 1998. After attending West Point, Mr. Whitehead received a B.S. in Accounting from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and received his M.B.A. from the Kellogg Graduate School at Northwestern University.

Board of Directors

All of our directors hold office until the next annual meeting of stockholders and the election and qualification of their successors. Directors serve without compensation and without other fixed remuneration. Directors are entitled to receive stock options under our 2002 Stock Option and 2006 Incentive Stock Plan as determined by the Board of Directors. We reimburse our directors for expenses incurred in connection with attending Board meetings.

The following is a summary of the committees on which our directors serve.

34


Audit Committee

Our Audit Committee currently consists of William Whitehead, Norm Dumbroff and Neil Hebenton, with Mr. Whitehead elected as Chairman of the Committee. Our Board of Directors has determined that each of Messrs. Whitehead, Dumbroff and Hebenton are “independent” as that term is defined under applicable SEC rules and under the current listing standards of the NASDAQ Stock Market. Mr. Whitehead is our audit committee financial expert.

Our Audit Committee’s responsibilities include: (i) reviewing the independence, qualifications, services, fees, and performance of the independent auditors, (ii) appointing, replacing and discharging the independent auditors, (iii) pre-approving the professional services provided by the independent auditors, (iv) reviewing the scope of the annual audit and reports and recommendations submitted by the independent auditors, and (v) reviewing our financial reporting and accounting policies, including any significant changes, with management and the independent auditors. Our Audit Committee also prepares the Audit Committee report that is required pursuant to the rules of the SEC.

Executive Committee

Our Executive Committee currently consists of Norm Dumbroff, Neil Hebenton and William Whitehead, with Mr. Dumbroff elected as Chairman of the Committee. Our Board of Directors has determined that all of the members are “independent” under the current listing standards of the NASDAQ Stock Market. Our Board of Directors has adopted a written charter setting forth the authority and responsibilities of the Executive Committee.

Our Executive Committee has responsibility for assisting the Board of Directors in, among other things, evaluating and making recommendations regarding the compensation of our executive officers and directors, assuring that the executive officers are compensated effectively in a manner consistent with our stated compensation strategy, producing an annual report on executive compensation in accordance with the rules and regulations promulgated by the SEC, periodically evaluating the terms and administration of our incentive plans and benefit programs and monitoring of compliance with the legal prohibition on loans to our directors and executive officers.

Nominating Committee

Our Nominating Committee currently consists of Neil Hebenton, Norm Dumbroff and William Whitehead, with Mr. Hebenton elected as Chairman of the Committee. The Board of Directors has determined that all of the members are “independent” under the current listing standards of the NASDAQ Stock Market.

Our Nominating Committee has responsibility for assisting the Board in, among other things, effecting the organization, membership and function of the Board and its committees. The Nominating Committee shall identify and evaluate the qualifications of all candidates for nomination for election as directors.

35


EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
 
The following table sets forth in summary form the compensation received during the fiscal years ended April 30, 2005, 2004, and 2003 by our Chief Executive Officer and each of our four other most highly compensated executive officers based on salary and bonus earned during the 2005 fiscal year:
 
Summary Compensation Table
 
   
Long-Term Compensation
     
   
Annual Compensation
 
Awards
 
Payouts
     
Name and Principal Position
 
Fiscal Year
 
Annual Salary
($)
 
Annual Bonus
($)
 
Other
Annual
Compensation
($)
 
Restricted Stock Awards
($)
 
Securities
Underlying
Options/SARs
(#) (5)
 
LTIP Payouts
($)
 
All Other
Compensation
($)
 
                                   
Andrew Hidalgo,
   
2005
   
168,000
   
---
   
9,549
(6)
 
---
   
154,167
   
---
   
---
 
Chairman, CEO and
   
2004
   
154,500
   
17,000
   
7,958
(6)
 
---
   
---
   
---
   
---
 
Director
   
2003
   
141,000
   
---
   
---
   
---
   
---
   
---
   
---
 
                                                   
Donald Walker,
   
2005
   
140,000
   
10,269
   
---
   
---
   
---
   
---
   
---
 
Executive Vice President (1)
   
2004
   
140,000
   
26,962
   
---
   
---
   
16,667
   
---
   
---
 
 
   
2003
   
41,160
   
2,669
   
---
   
---
   
---
   
---
   
---
 
                                                   
Gary Walker,
   
2005
   
140,000
   
10,269
   
---
   
---
   
2,084
   
---
   
---
 
President-Walker Comm
   
2004
   
140,000
   
26,962
   
---
   
---
   
16,667
   
---
   
---
 
and Director (2)
   
2003
   
42,333
   
2,669
   
---
   
---
   
---
   
---
   
---
 
                                                   
James Heinz,
   
2005
   
140,000
   
---
   
---
   
---
   
10,000
   
---
   
---
 
Executive Vice President (3)
   
2004
   
10,231
   
---
   
---
   
---
   
---
   
---
   
---
 
 
   
2003
   
---
   
---
   
---
   
---
   
---
   
---
   
---
 
                                                   
Joseph Heater,
   
2005
   
132,000
   
---
   
---
   
---
   
35,000
   
---
   
---
 
Chief Financial Officer (4)
   
2004
   
95,500
   
8,000
   
---
   
---
   
33,334
   
---
   
---
 
     
2003
   
---
   
---
   
---
   
---
   
---
   
---
   
---
 
 

 
(1)
Mr. Walker has served as Executive Vice President since December 30, 2002.

(2)
Mr. Walker has served as President of Walker Comm and as a Director since December 30, 2002.

(3)
Mr. Heinz has served as Executive Vice President since April 2, 2004.

(4)
Mr. Heater has served as Chief Financial Officer since July 15, 2003.

(5)
The number of securities under options granted reflects the number of WPCS shares that may be purchased upon the exercise of options. We do not have any outstanding stock appreciation rights.

(6)
Represents car allowance payments.

Employment Agreements

Contract with Andrew Hidalgo

On February 1, 2004, we entered into a three-year employment contract with Andrew Hidalgo, our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. Upon each one year anniversary of the agreement, the agreement will automatically renew for another three years from the anniversary date. The base salary under the agreement is $168,000 per annum. In addition, Mr. Hidalgo is entitled to participate in any and all benefit plans, from time to time, in effect for our employees, along with vacation, sick and holiday pay in accordance with our policies established and in effect from time to time.


36


Contract with Joseph Heater

On June 1, 2005, we entered into a three-year employment contract with Joseph Heater, our Chief Financial Officer. Upon each one year anniversary of the agreement, the agreement will automatically renew for another three years from the anniversary date. The base salary under the agreement is $140,000 per annum. In addition, Mr. Heater is entitled to participate in any and all benefit plans, from time to time, in effect for our employees, along with vacation, sick and holiday pay in accordance with our policies established and in effect from time to time.

Contract with Donald Walker

On December 30, 2002, we entered into a four-year employment contract with an option to renew for an additional year, with Donald Walker, the Vice-President of Walker Comm, who is also an Executive Vice President. The base salary under the agreement is $140,000 per annum. In addition, Mr. Walker is entitled to participate in any and all benefit plans, from time to time, in effect for our employees, along with vacation, sick and holiday pay in accordance with our policies established and in effect from time to time. Mr. Walker is also entitled to the full-time use of an automobile owned or leased by us, for which we reimburse Mr. Walker for all maintenance and gasoline expenses associated with the use of the automobile. Mr. Walker is also entitled to receive an annual bonus of 3% of the operating income of Walker Comm: (i) after the elimination of all expenses related to (y) services provided to Walker Comm by WPCS or any affiliate thereof and (z) transactions between Walker Comm and WPCS or any affiliate thereof; and (ii) prior to the deduction of interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization.

Contract with Gary Walker

On December 30, 2002, we entered into a four-year employment contract with an option to renew for an additional year, with Gary Walker, the President of Walker Comm, who is also a Director. The base salary under the agreement is $140,000 per annum. In addition, Mr. Walker is entitled to participate in any and all benefit plans, from time to time, in effect for our employees, along with vacation, sick and holiday pay in accordance with our policies established and in effect from time to time. Mr. Walker is also entitled to the full-time use of an automobile owned or leased by us, for which we reimburse Mr. Walker for all maintenance and gasoline expenses associated with the use of the automobile. Mr. Walker is also entitled to receive an annual bonus of 3% of the operating income of Walker Comm: (i) after the elimination of all expenses related to (y) services provided to Walker Comm by WPCS or any affiliate thereof and (z) transactions between Walker Comm and WPCS or any affiliate thereof; and (ii) prior to the deduction of interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization.

Contract with James Heinz

On April 2, 2004, we entered into a three-year employment contract with James Heinz, the President of Heinz, who is also an Executive Vice President. The base salary under the agreement is $140,000 per annum. In addition, Mr. Heinz is entitled to participate in any and all benefit plans, from time to time, in effect for our employees, along with vacation, sick and holiday pay in accordance with our policies established and in effect from time to time. Mr. Heinz is also entitled to the full-time use of an automobile owned or leased by us, for which we reimburse Mr. Heinz for all maintenance and gasoline expenses associated with the use of the automobile. Mr. Heinz is also entitled to receive an annual bonus of 2.5% of quarterly operating income, before the deduction of interest and income taxes of Heinz, WPCS Incorporated and Invisinet, Inc.

Contract with Richard Schubiger

On August 1, 2005, we entered into a three-year employment contract with Richard Schubiger, the President of Quality, who is also an Executive Vice President. The base salary under the agreement is $140,000 per annum. In addition, Mr. Schubiger is entitled to participate in any and all benefit plans, from time to time, in effect for our employees, along with vacation, sick and holiday pay in accordance with our policies established and in effect from time to time. Pursuant to the agreement, Mr. Schubiger earned a bonus of $36,000 for the calendar year ended December 31, 2005, resulting from Quality achieving at least $13 million in revenue and such revenue yielded a minimum of 12% in earnings before interest and taxes. Effective January 1, 2006, Mr. Schubiger is entitled to receive an annual bonus of 3.0% of earnings before the deduction of interest and income taxes of Quality.
 

 
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Stock Option Plans

The 2002 Stock Option Plan was adopted by the Board of Directors in September 2002 and increased from 41,667 to 416,667 options on March 3, 2003, and approved by the stockholders in April 2004. The 2002 Plan provides for the issuance of up to 416,667 options. The 2006 Incentive Stock Plan was adopted by the Board of Directors and approved by the stockholders in September 2005. The 2006 Plan provides for the issuance of up to 400,000 shares and/or options.

2002 Stock Option Plan

The primary purpose of the 2002 Stock Option Plan is to attract and retain the best available personnel for us in order to promote the success of our business and to facilitate the ownership of our stock by employees. The 2002 Stock Option Plan is administered by our Board of Directors. Under the 2002 Stock Option Plan, key employees, officers, directors and consultants are entitled to receive awards. The 2002 Stock Option Plan permits the granting of incentive stock options and non-qualified stock options with the purchase price, vesting and expiration terms set by the Board of Directors.

2006 Incentive Stock Plan

The primary purpose of the 2006 Incentive Stock Plan is to attract and retain the best available personnel for us in order to promote the success of our business and to facilitate the ownership of our stock by employees. The 2006 Incentive Stock Plan is administered by our Board of Directors. Under the 2006 Incentive Stock Plan, key employees, officers, directors and consultants are entitled to receive awards. The 2006 Incentive Stock Plan permits the granting of incentive stock options, non-qualified stock options and shares of common stock with the purchase price, vesting and expiration terms set by the Board of Directors. 

Option Grants During 2005 Fiscal Year

The following table provides information related to options granted to the named executive officers during the 2005 fiscal year. We do not have any outstanding stock appreciation rights.

 
 
Name
   
No. of Securities Underlying Options Granted (#)
 
 
% of Total Options Granted to Employees in Fiscal Year
   
Exercise Price ($/Share)
 
 
Expiration Date
 
 
                         
Andrew Hidalgo
   
154,167
   
57.8
%
 
6.60
   
10/6/2009
 
Gary Walker
   
2,084
   
0.8
%
 
4.80
   
12/20/2009
 
James Heinz
   
10,000
   
3.8
%
 
5.25
   
2/1/2010
 
Joseph Heater
   
25,000
   
9.4
%
 
6.60
   
10/6/2009
 
Joseph Heater
   
10,000
   
3.8
%
 
5.25
   
2/1/2010
 


38


Aggregated Option Exercises During 2005 Fiscal Year and Fiscal Year-End Option Values

The following table provides information related to employee options exercised by the named executive officers during the 2005 fiscal year and number and value of such options held at fiscal year-end.
 
           
Number of Securities Underlying Unexercised Options at Fiscal Year-End (#)
 
Value of Unexercised In-the-Money Options at Fiscal Year-End ($) (1)
Name
 
Shares Acquired on Exercise (#)
 
Value Realized
 
Exercisable
 
Unexercisable
 
Exercisable
 
Unexercisable
                         
Andrew Hidalgo
 
-
 
-
 
154,167
 
-
 
-
 
-
                         
Gary Walker
 
-
 
-
 
2,084
 
-
 
$ 313
 
-
                         
James Heinz
 
-
 
-
 
10,000
 
-
 
-
 
-
                         
Joseph Heater
 
-
 
-
 
25,000
 
-
 
-
 
-
                         
Joseph Heater
 
-
 
-
 
10,000
 
-
 
-
 
-